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Full text of "Annual report"

THE TOWN OF 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

2010 ANNUAL REPORT 











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2010-2011 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Standing left to right (back) - Patrick McNally, William Craft, Raymond Morley (Vice 
Chairman), Charles Surpitski (Chairman), and Shirley Berry. 



Cover Photo: Maplecroft Farm Open Space 

Photographer: Jerry and Marcy Monkman/EcoPhotography.com 

Annual Town Report Compiled by Frank Antonucci 



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

2010 









S 



THE BIRTHPLACE 

OF AJVEERIC AN 

INB£F£NDENCE 



TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 


3 


May 1 1 , 2010 Annual Town Meeting 


13 


October 25, 2010 Special Town Meeting 


24 


General Government 




Board of Selectmen 


40 


Finance Committee 


41 


Town Manager 


42 


Special Asst. Town Manager, Purchasing 


44 


Department of Public Safety 




Police Department 


44 


Fire Department 


46 


Animal Control 


48 


Harbors 


49 


Shellfish 


50 


Department of Public Works 




Public Works Divisions 


51 


Facilities Department 


53 


Cemeteries/Parks Department 


55 


Department of Code Enforcement 




Building Department 


56 


Health Department 


57 


Zoning Board of Appeals 


58 


Department of Planning and 




Development 




Planning Board 


60 


Conservation Commission 


62 


Historical Commission 


63 


Housing Partnership 


64 


Open Space Committee 


65 


Agricultural Commission 


65 


Department of Human Services 




Recreation Department 


66 


Youth Services 


67 


Council on Aging 


68 


Veterans' Services 


69 


Department of Utilities 




Electric Department 


70 


Water Division 


70 


Wastewater Treatment 


72 


Finance Directorate 




Accounting Office 


72 
1 



Treasurer/Collector 


73 


Assessors' Office 


73 


Town Clerk 


74 


Elections and Registrations 


75 


MIS Department 


76 


Ipswich Public Library 


77 


School Department 


79 


Hall-Haskell House 


86 


Ipswich Bay Circuit Trail Committee 


86 


Government Study Committee 


87 


Recycling Committee 


'87 


Trust Fund Commission 


88 



2010 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



Elected 



Member 



Moderator 
(1 year) 

Board of Selectmen 
(3 years) 



A. James Grimes III 



Charles D. Surpitski, Chair 

Raymond K. Morley 

Patrick J. McNally 

Shirley A. Berry 

William M. Craft 



School Committee 
(3 years) 



Hugh O'Flynn, Chair 

Barry Hopping 

Edmund Traverso 

Jeffrey B. Loeb 

Laura Dietz 

Sean Gresh 

Norman Sheppard 



Appointed 

Finance Committee 
(3 years) 



Whittier Regional Technical Vocational 
High School Representative 

Town Officials 



Jamie M. Fay, Chair 

Larry E. Seidler, V-Chair 

Mitch Feldman 

Michael J. Schaaf 

Marion W. Swan 

Richard F. Howard 

Robert A. White 

Janice Clements-Skelton 

Todd Wilson 

Lynne Gibbs, Admin. Asst. 

Raymond K. Morley 



Town Manager 

Special Assistant to the Town Manager 

Administrative Assistant to TM/BOS 

Superintendent of Schools 

Director of Finance 
MIS Director 



Robert T. Markel 
Frank V. Antonucci 
Jennifer F. Breaker 

Richard L. Korb 

Rita M. Negri 
Gregory Parachojuk 



Assessor 

Town Clerk 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Treasurer/Collector 

Assistant Treasurer 

Deputy Tax Collector 



Robin Nolan 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane 

Kathleen A. Marini 

Kevin A. Merz 

Donald J. Carter 

Kelly and Ryan Associates Inc. 



Director of Code Enforcement 

Local Building Inspector 

Health Agent 

Food Inspector 

Plumbing & Gas Inspector 

Alternate Plumbing & Gas Inspector 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Fence Viewer 

Wiring Inspector 

Asst. Wiring Inspector 



James A. Sperber 

Eric Colville 

Colleen Fermon 

Maureen Lee 

Cranney Companies 

Kevin Lombard 

Dwight Brothers 

James A. Sperber 

Donald R. Stone 

David Levesque, Sr. 



Director of Plant & Facilities 
Assistant to Facilities Director 



William A. Hodge 
Jane Spellman 



Director of Public Works 

Operations Manager 

Superintendent of Cemetery & Parks 



Richard Clarke 

Frank Ventimiglia 

Jeffrey Putur 



Fire Chief 
Fire Prevention Officer 



Arthur Howe 
Rick Smith 



Police Chief 
Police Lieutenant 



Paul Nikas 
Daniel Moriarity 



Harbormaster 
Assistant Harbormaster 

Shellfish Constable 
Asst Shellfish Constable 



Paul Nikas 

Thomas Colpitts 

Scott LaPreste 

Jeremy Smith 



Emergency Management Director 
Assistant Emergency Mgt Director 



Arthur Howe 
Daniel Moriarty 



Animal Control Officer 
Assistant Animal Control Officer 



Matthew Antczak 
Reed Wilson 



Director of Human Services 

Director of Council on Aging 

Town Historian 



Elizabeth M. Dorman 

Diane Mitchell 

Patricia Tyler 



Library Director 
Assistant Library Director 

Director of Planning & Development 

Assistant Planner 

Affordable Housing Coordinator 

Open Space Program Manager 

Stewardship Coordinator 

Conservation Agent 

Town Counsel 



Director of Utilities 

Business Manager/Utilities 

Electric Operations Manager 

Water and Waste Water Manager 



Victor E. Dyer 
Genevieve Picard 

Glenn C. Gibbs 
Kathleen Connor 
Terry Anderson 
Kristen Grubbs 
Beth O'Connor 
David P. Pancoast 

Attorney George Hall Jr. 
Anderson and Krieger 

Tim Henry 

Mark Cousins 

Gerry Cavanaugh 

Victoria Halmen 



Veterans Services District 



Terrance P. Hart 



Boards and Committees 



Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board 



Agricultural Commission 



Alternates 



Susan Monahan, Chair 
James Warner 
Michael Jones 
Glenn C. Gibbs 
Ingrid F. Miles 

Royce Knowlton, Co-Chair 

Warren Jepson, Co-Chair 

Michael Marini 

Kat Kenny 

Donald Galicki 

Dianne Cassidy 

Augusta Macrokanis 

Laura Russell 

Bill Cassidy 



Athletic Playing Fields Study Committee 



Ken Swenson, Chair 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Barry Hopping 

Carl Nylen 

John Gillis 

Susan Markos 

Elizabeth Dorman 

Kristen Grubbs 



Jeffrey Putur 



Audit Committee 



William Craft, Chair 

Robert White (Finance Com) 

Jeff Loeb (School Committee) 

Larry Pszenney 

William Callahan 



Board of Assessors 



Robin Nolan 

John Moberger 

Karen L. Rassias 



Bay Circuit Trail Committee 



Lawrence G. Eliot, Chair 

Barbara Ostberg 

Mary Cunningham 

Ralph Williams 

Norman Marsh 

Linda Coan 



Ipswich Community Access Media (ICAM) 



Robert Ryan, Chair 

Gregory Parachojuk 

Ann Savage 

James Maloney 

Scott Ames 



Cemetery & Parks Commission 



James Graffum 
Harry Argeropoulos 
Theodore Lemieux 



Commission on Energy Use & 
Climate Protection 



Ken Savoie, Chair 

Charlie Flowers 

Robert Markel 

Ingrid Miles, Chair 

Tim Henry 

David Feldman 

William Bingham 

Marc Simon 

Heidi Paek 

Brian Ditchek 

Sarah Simon 

Michael Johnson 



Community Development Plan 
Implementation Task Force 



William Bingham, Chair 

Thomas Mayo 

William Gallagher 

Richard Kallman 



Ingrid F. Miles 

Glenn Gibbs 

Kathleen Connor 



Commuter Rail Committee 



Dorcas Rice, Chair 

Robert Waldner 

Joseph Carlin 

Chris Curry 

Paul Sanborn 



Conservation Commission 



Alternative 
Conservation Agent 



David Standley, Chair 

Jennifer Hughes, Vice Chair 

William McDavitt 

Sissy Folliott 

Brian F. O'Neill 

Karl Kastorf 

Catherine Carney Feldman 

David P. Pancoast 



Constable 



Peter Dziadose 



Council On Aging 



Elizabeth Nelson, Chair 
Cheryl Ferris 
Tone Kenney 
Dorothy Butcher 
Pat Parady 
Keith Carlson 
Claire Phillips 



Cultural Council 
(3 years) 



Terri Unger, Chair 

Deborah Barnwell 

Jennifer Carlson 

Marianne Cellucci 

Jane Ward 

Barta Hathaway 

Linda Laterowicz 

Katherine McElwain 

Michelle Shibley-McGrath 

Mike Souter 



Design Review Board 



Alternate Member 



Maiya Dos 

Dianna Pacella 

Bryan Townsend 

Mitchell Lowe 

Ken Savoie 



Alternate Member 



Eight Towns & the Bay Committee 



Mary Kroesser 

Franz Ingelfinger 
Glenn Wood 



Electric Light Sub-Committee 



Charles D. Surpitski, Chair 

Raymond K. Morley 

S. Michael Schaaf 

James Engel 

Edward Sklarz 



Fair Housing 



Tone Kenney 
Robert T. Markel 



Government Study Committee 



Gerry Anne Brown, Chair 

Jeremy Hathaway 

David Standley 

Laura Hamilton 

Laura Dietz 

Diana Hebert 

Charlotte Eliot 



Hall-Haskell Committee 



Theresa Stephens. Chair 

William Nelson 

William Thoen 

Stephanie Gaskins 

James C. Lahar 

Margaret Broekel 

Ed Sukach 



Board of Health 



Susan C. Hubbard. Chair 

Spencer R. Amesbury, MD 

Charles Hill 



Historical Commission 



June S. Gahan, Chair 

Willard Maker 

Bryan Townsend 

Francis Wiedennman 

Judy A. Field 

Marjorie H. Robie 

Al Boynton 



Housing Authority (5 years) 



Tone Kenney, Chair 

Edgar Turner (State Appt.) 
Kenneth M. Blades 



Moriah K. Marsh 
Connie Price 



Affordable Housing Partnership 



Michael Schaaf, Chair 

James M. Warner 

Michael Jones 

Edward D. Dick 

Moriah Marsh 

William "Jay" Gallagher 

Donald Bowen 



Ipswich River Watershed 
District Advisory Board 

Library Trustees 



David Standley 



George R. Gray, Chair 
Lawrence J. Pszenny 
Marie Louise Scudder 

Hugh McCall 

Robert K. Weatherall 

Judith L. Rusin 

Helen Danforth 

William Thoen 

Marion Frost 



Mosquito Control Advisory Board 



Robert A. Gambale, Chair 

Lisa Galanis 

Ed Ruta 

Ernest Brockelbank. 

Anne Wallace 



Open Space Committee 



Wayne Castonguay, Co-Chair 
Carolyn Britt, Co-Chair 
Carl Nylen 
Ralph Williams 
Glenn Hazelton 
David Standley 
Alex Van Alen 



Planning Board (5 years) 



Associate Member (2 years) 



Timothy A. Purinton, Co-Chair 

James A. Manzi, Co-Chair 

Robert L. Weatherall 

Cathryn Chadwick 

Brian Hone, Co-Chair 

Suzanne Benfield 

Kathleen Milano 



Public Safety Facilities Committee 



Charles Supitski, Chair 

Edward D. Dick 

Robert T. Markel 

William Thoen 

Paul McGinley 

Roland Gallant 

John Morris 

Sean Cronin 

Jamie Fay 

Arthur Howe 

William A. Hodge 

William A. Hodge 

Richard L. Korb 

Jeffrey B. Loeb 

Jean Emerson 

James E. Graffum 

Peter Foote 



Recreation Committee 



Edith Cook, Chair 
Christina Mercier 

Anne Josephson 

Adam Gray 
Kathryn Sheppard 

Dan McCormick 
Matthew Bodwell 



Recycling Committee 



Tim Bishop, Chair 

Penny Devoe 

Mark Avenmarg 

Amy Frank 

Rick Clarke 

Judy Sedgewick 

David Benedix 

Mike Judy 

Elizabeth Kilcoyne (Assoc. Mem) 

Jill Gleim (Assoc. Mem.) 
Fiona Stewart (Assoc. Member) 



Registrar of Voters 



Rob Stone 

Diane Young 

Peter Ross 



Sandy Point Advisory Committee 



Joseph W. Parks 
Stanley W. Wood 



Shellfish Sub-Committee 



Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, Co-Chair 



10 



Charles D. Surpitski, Co-Chair 

Scott LaPreste 

Wayne Castonguay 

Bradford McGowan 

Anthony Murawski 

Gary Collum 
Michael Lambros 



Shade Tree & Beautification 
Committee 



Jennifer Tougas, Chair 

Robert Gravino 

Armand Michaud 

Elizabeth A Kilcoyne 

Janet Craft 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Martha Varrell 

Martha Chase 

Denise King 



Trust Fund Commission 



Richard Fates 

Jean Emerson 

Alexander Colby 



Water Sub Committee 



Shirley A. Berry 
Mitch Feldman 

Raymond Morely 

James Engel 

Paul Brailsford 



Wastewater Sub Committee 



Patrick J. McNally, Chair, BOS 

William M. Craft, BOS 

Todd Wilson, FINCOM 

James Engel 

Brian Kubaska 



Waterways Advisory Committee 



Ken Spellman, Chair 

Ronald Cameron 

Bill Callahan 

Rob Cox 

Jeffrey French 

John Wigglesworth 

Elton McCausland 



Zoning Board of Appeals 



11 



Robert A. Gambale, Chair. 

Benjamin Fierro 

Timothy S. Perkins 

Roger LeBlanc 



William A. Page (Alternate) 
Alternative Members Keri MacRae 

Lewis Vlahos 



12 



RECORD OF ACTION TAKEN AT THE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 11, 2010 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the Town of Ipswich met in the Ipswich High 
School/Middle School Performing Arts Center in said town of Ipswich on Tuesday, May 1 1, 2010. A quorum 
being present (240 present-200 required), the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Arthur James 
Grimes, III, 7:55 P.M. 

Non registered persons were given permission to attend the meeting as spectators and were seated on the floor 
in the back of the room on the left of the stage. 

ARTICLE 1 ; CONSENT CALENDAR 

On Motion of Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, 
Motion Carried to: 

(1) Fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers as presented in the town and school operating 
budgets; 

(2) Choose the following officers, viz: a Moderator for one [1] year; two [2] Selectmen for three [3] years; two 
[2] members of the School Committee for three [3] years; and one (1) member of the Housing Authority for 
five years, the above officers to be voted on one ballot at the YMCA Gymnasium, 1 10 County Road, on 
TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010. The polls shall open at 7:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 p.m.; 

(3) Transfer $275,000 from surplus funds in the Electric Division to the General Fund; 

(4) Authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint temporarily a member of said Board to be Acting Town 
Manager for a limited period of time not to exceed the date of the 201 1 Annual Town Meeting for purposes 
of vacation, leave, or absence in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 268 A, sections 20 
and 2 1 A. 

ARTICLE 2 FINANCE COMMITTEE ELECTION 

On Motion of William Craft, duly seconded, 

Motion Carried Unanimously to: 

Elect Marion W. Swan to the Finance Committee for a term of three (3) years. 

ARTICLE 3 FY' 10 TOWN BUDGET AMENDMENTS 

On Motion of Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, duly seconded, 

Motion Carried Unanimously to: 

AMEND ITS ACTION TAKEN UNDER ARTICLES 4 OF THE MAY 12, 2009, ANNUAL TOWN 

MEETING (THE FY' 10 MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET), TO TRANSFER; 



13 



Dept 


Description 


Account # 


From 


12 


Selectmen 


Salary 


11221-5111 




999.92 


Selectmen 


Advertising 


11222-5304 


3,500.00 




Town Mgr 


Salary 


11231-5113 




1,300.00 


Town Mgr 


Temp PT 


11231-5121 




287.50 


Town Mgr 


Labor Relations 


11232-5308 


8,394.00 




Legal 


Legal Services 


11242-5312 




78,000.00 


Reserve Fund 


Reserve Fund 


11322-5730 


10.000.00 




Accounting 


Overtime 


11341-5131 


1,000.00 




Purchasing 


Permanent Wages 


(1361-5115 


2,697.98 




Purchasing 


Safety Supplies 


11362-5426 


200.00 




Purchasing 


Mileage 


11362-5711 


174.98 




Purchasing 


Meals & Lodging 


11362-5712 


141.23 




Purchasing 


Conference Reg. 


11362-5733 


50.00 




Assessor 


Appointed Salary 


11371-5112 




1,318.21 


Assessor 


Sick Leave Buyback 


11371-5126 




5,631.79 


Treasurer 


Legal Deeds 


11382-5303 


295.00 




Treasurer 


Data Processing 


11382-5306 


44.00 




Treasurer 


Printed Forms 


11382-5422 


3,000.00 




Treasurer 


Conference Reg. 


11382-5733 


100.00 




Treasurer 


Cash Variance 


11382-5935 


100.00 




Treasurer 


Banking Fees 


11382-5936 


100.00 




Information Tech 


Equipment 


11543-5815 




6,785.00 


Town Clerk 


Maintenance Contract 


11612-5244 


95.00 




Town Clerk 


Printed Forms 


11612-5422 


200.00 




Town Clerk 


Meals & Lodging 


11612-5712 


607.00 





14 



Dept 


Description 


Account # 


From To 


Town Clerk 


Conference Reg. 


11612-5733 


200.00 


Planning 


Program supplies 


11712-5583 


50.00 


Planning 


Conference Reg. 


11712-5733 


150.00 


Planning 


Special Printing 


11712-5423 


100.00 


Planning 


Legal Deeds 


11712-5303 


50.00 


Planning 


Training 


11712-5511 


100.00 


Planning Contracts 


Postage 


11722-5342 


100.00 


Planning Contracts 


Advertising 


11722-5304 


100.00 


Conservation 


Other Equipment 


11732-5485 


300.00 


Conservation 


Pubs & Subs 


11732-5732 


100.00 


Historical Comm. 


Other Consultants 


11752-5311 


150.00 


Benefits 


Health Insurance 


11911-5175 


41,000.00 


Benefits 


Medicare 


11911-5194 


7,600.00 


Insurance 


Package Insurance 


11922-5742 


10,000.00 


Misc Exp 


Leases 


11932-5270 


100.00 


Misc Exp 


Postage 


11932-5342 


3,000.00 


Police 


Diff/Incent 


12101-5141 


15,000.00 


Police 


Maintenance Contract 


12102-5244 


9,446.21 


Police 


Ambulance 


12102-5381 


9,350.00 


Fire 


Sick Leave Buyback 


12201-5126 


18,782.48 


Fire 


Med Exam 


12202-5301 


600.00 


Fire 


Two Way Radio 


12202-5344 


1,000.00 


Fire 


Printed Forms 


12202-5422 


200.00 


Fire 


Fire Prevention 


12202-5490 


250.00 


Fire 


Training 


12202-5511 


3,000.00 


Building Insp. 


Training 


12512-5511 


200.00 



15 



Dept: 


Description: 


Account # 


From: 


To: 


Building Insp. 


Oil & Lube 


12512-5481 


75.00 




Building Insp. 


Other Consultants 


12512-5311 


200.00 




Building Insp. 


Software 


12513-5821 


8,000.00 




Harbormaster 


Other Pay 


12951-5123 


1,000.00 




Shellfish 


Appointed Salary 


12961-5112 




6,147.97 


PW Admin 


Appt Salary 


14211-5112 


13,466.26 




Equip Maint 


Overtime 


14221-5131 


1,444.28 




Equip Maint 


Gasoline 


14222-5215 


11,374.00 




Equip Maint 


Diesel Fuel 


14222-5216 


11,250.55 




Hwy 


Other Pay 


14241-5123 


2,253.15 




Forestry 


Perm Wages 


14251-5115 


3,000.00 




Sanitation 


Sanitary Collection 


14312-5385 


59,784.00 




Facilities 


Oil Heat 


14722-5213 


5,165.00 




Facilities 


Building Supplies 


14722-5431 


2,000.00 




Facilities 


Electricity 


14722-5211 


2,600 




Facilities 


Gas 


14722-5212 


1,700.00 




Cemetery 


Appointed Salary 


14911-5112 




1,527.73 


Cemetery 


Perm Wages 


14911-5115 




1,669.32 


Cemetery 


Sick Leave Buyback 


14911-5126 




16,967.74 


Health 


Permanent Wages 


15121-5115 




436.08 


Health 


Association Dues 


15122-5731 


100.00 




Health 


Conference Reg. 


15122-5733 


200.00 




Veterans Services 


Medical 


15432-5772 




26,000.00 


Library 


Office equipment 


16102-5725 


573.00 




Library 


Training 


16102-5511 


350.00 




Library 


Repair/Replace 


16102-5340 


200.00 





16 



Dept: 


Description: 


Account # 


From: 


To: 


Recreation 


Civic Observances 


16202-5354 


500.00 




Recreation 


Program Supp 


16202-5583 


500.00 




Recreation 


Conference Reg. 


16202-5733 


300.00 




Recreation 


Program Services 


16202-5351 


500.00 




Debt Service 


Short Term Interest 


17002-5916 




1,326.90 


Debt Service 


Debt Issue Exp 


17002-5930 


5,000.00 
215,780.64 


215,780.64; 


and to appropriate: 










Dept: 


Description: 


Account # 


From: 


To: 


Town Ins. 










Recovery 


Ins. reimbursement 


D61 102-5950 


40,194.81 




Fire 


Motor Vehicles 


12202-5245 




40,194.81; 



So that the 2010 Municipal Operating Budget, as so amended and inclusive of override 
Debt service, shall total 14,087,957.81 offset by revenues totaling 495,498.81 leaving an 
Amount to be raised and assessed of 13,592,459. 



ARTICLE 4 



FY 2011 MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGE 



On Motion of Jamie Fay, duly seconded, it 

Carried on a Unanimous Voice Vote to: 

(1) Raise and appropriate the sum of $13,258,830 for the purposes indicated in the FY 201 1 Municipal 

Operating Budget as outlined in the Finance Committee Report, and that, in addition to the $13,258,830, 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate: 



(2) for Excluded Debt Service. 



for a Total Appropriation of 

(2) To transfer from available funds: 

from Free Cash 

from Free Cash (restricted revenue - Library). . . . 

from Fund Balance Reserved for Debt Premium 

from 4% Tourism 

from Library Construction Grant 

from the Overlay Surplus 



$933,044 
$14,191,874; 

$0.00 

$11,134 

$1,015 

$1,000 

$60,300 
$92,500 



17 



For total available funds of $1 65,949 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of $1 4,025,925 

ARTICLE 5 FY 2011 SCHOOL BUDGET 

3n Motion of Jeffrey Loeb, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to: 

1) Raise and appropriate the sum of $20,363,261 for the School Department budget for FY 201 1, and 

[2) Transfer from available funds: 

Overlay Surplus $92,500 

Total Available Funds $92,50 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of $20,270,761 

ARTICLE 6 HIGH SCHOOL/MIDDLE SCHOOL DEBT SERVICE 

3n Motion of Joan K. Arsenault, duly seconded, it 
Carried Unanimously to: 

liaise and appropriate the sum of $2,544,125 for FY 201 1 debt service payments related to the construction and 
finishing of the new Middle School and High School including, without limitation, moving expenses and 
expenses necessary to secure the former Whipple Middle School. 

\RTICLE 7 WHITTIER REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL BUDGET 

3n Motion of Raymond K. Morley, duly seconded, 

Motion Failed to Pass to: 

liaise and appropriate the sum of $350,095 for the Town's share of the FY 201 1 annual operating, capital and 
debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District. 

ARTICLE 8 FY 2011 WATER & SEWER BUDGETS 

3n Motion of Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to: 

1) Raise and appropriate the sum of $2,624,667 for the FY 201 1 operating budget, debt service, and capital 
expenses of the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset in part by $275,760 from the 
water surplus account; $45,000 from water liens; $20,500 in application fees and other miscellaneous revenues, 
vvith the balance of said appropriation being met by revenues of $2,283,407 of the Water Division during 

18 



r 



FY2011 and; 

2) Raise and appropriate the sum of $1,492,041 for the FY 201 1 operating budget, debt 
service, and capital expenses of the Wastewater Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to 
be offset in part by $25,500 from sewer liens; $6,500 in sewer betterment payments; $426,000 
in septage treatment fees, Agresource royalties, application fees and other miscellaneous 
revenues; with the balance of said appropriation being met by revenues of $1,034,041 of the 
Wastewater Division during FY 201 1 . 

Patrick J. McNally, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, recognized Ingrid F. Miles and Elizabeth A. 
Kilcoyne for their many years of service to the Town as members of the Board of Selectmen. 

Jeffrey B. Loeb, Chairman of the School Committee, recognized Joan K. Arsenault for her many years i 
service to the Town as a member of the School Committee. 

ARTICLE 9 CITIZENS' PETITTo i 

On Motion of Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, it 

Carried to: 

Postpone this article indefinitely 

ARTICLE 10 CITIZENS' PETITIO 

Main Motion by Linda D. Alexson: 

That the Town vote to amend "Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts-Shellfish Rules and Regulations" by 
deleting "Section 13-Shellfish Grant Regulations" or take any other action relative thereto. 

Amended motion by Linda D. Alexson: 

There was a duly seconded motion to amend the main motion by substituting the following motion: 

That the Town vote to recommend to the Board of Selectmen that said Selectmen amend the "Town of 
Ipswich, Massachusetts-Shellfish Rules and Regulations" and take any other necessary action to prohib 
the leasing of shellfish beds and waterways for private aquaculture or any other purposes. 

The Moderator declared that the amendment failed and that the original warrant article is out of order 
therefore the only action that the Town Meeting could take was to move to indefinitely postpone the 
article. 

ARTICLE 11 COMMITTEE REPORT 

On Motion of Patrick J. McNally duly seconded, it 

Passed to: 

Accept the reports of the Open Space & Recreation Committee, the Commuter Rail Committee and the 
Commission on Energy Use & Climate Protection Committee and; to continue the following committees as 

19 



landing committees of the Town: the Historic District Study Committee; the Commuter Rail Committee; 
pswich Coalition on Youth; Hall-Haskell Committee; the Open Space & Recreation Committee and the Ad 
Toe Committee examining the Feoffees of the Grammar School. 

Vt 11:15 p.m., the Town Meeting Body was asked by the Moderator whether or not they wished to 
ontinue the meeting or resume on Wednesday, May 12, 2010. The Moderator declared it was passed to 
ontinue. 

ARTICLE 12 SENIOR TAX DEFERRAL PROGRAM 

)n Motion of Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, it was 

/oted Unanimously to: 

ncrease the gross receipts that senior citizens may have in the prior calendar year to be eligible to defer 
>roperty taxes under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41 A from $20,000 to $40,000, 
vith such increase to be effective for deferrals granted for taxes assessed for any fiscal year beginning on July 
,2010. 

ARTICLE 13 PINE SWAMP ROAD LAND TRANSFER 

)n Motion of Raymond K. Morley, duly seconded, it was 

/oted (33 in favor - 9 opposed) to: 

Transfer the land described in a deed to the Town recorded with said Registry in Book 1449, Page 227 and 
;hown as Parcel 3 A on Town Assessors' Map 41 A, consisting of approximately 0.8 acres, from such board as 
las care, custody, and control for the purposes for which it is presently held, to the Board or Selectmen for the 
mrpose of conveyance, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey such land, and to convey all the 
Town's right, title and interest in and to the land shown on the plan entitled: "Plan of Land, 35 Pine Swamp 
load, Ipswich, Property of: Eugene Pelletier, Jr.", and recorded with the Essex South Registry of Deeds in Plan 
3ook 353, Plan 47 (the "Plan"), which may be one and the same, on such terms and conditions as the Board of 
Selectmen deems to be in the best interests of the Town, which may include acquisition of interests in land 
lereinafter described, and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire, by purchase, gift, or eminent 
lomain, easements and restrictions in the land shown on the Plan, for conservation and passive recreation 
mrposes 

Vlichael J. Schaaf presented James R. Engel with the Finance Committee's "Public Citizen" Award. 

ARTICLE 14 PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM BOND 

Dn Motion of Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, duly seconded, 

Vfain Motion Passed Unanimously to: 

Sorrow up to $2,000,000 to implement a pavement management program involving major street reconstruction. 

3n motion to amend by Jamie Fay, duly seconded, 

Amended Motion Failed to Pass to: 

20 



Borrow up to $1,300,000 to implement a pavement management program for the Central and South Main 
Streets; Washington Street and the North Green projects. 

ARTICLE 15 CHAPTER 90 

On Motion of Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to: 

Appropriate the sum of $346,381 under the provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws to obtain any 
materiel, equipment and/or services incidental thereto; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
easements in conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise; and in furtherance oil 
the project(s), to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal, state and/or 
private grants without further appropriation; and to meet this appropriation by transferring an equal sum from 
Chapter 90 available funds. 

ARTICLE 16 REVOLVING FUNDS 

On Motion of Charles D. Surpitski, duly seconded, it 
Carried to: 

Re-authorize for FY 201 1 the following revolving funds established under Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 44, Section 53E '/>: 

(1) A Council on Aging Revolving Fund, to be funded through activity fees and to be used to pay for special 1 
activities, expendable supplies and/or part-time wages, with no more than $100,000 to be expended by the 
Council on Aging from monies transferred into said fund during FY 201 1 ; and 

(2) An Historical Commission Revolving Fund, to pay for preservation of Town records and the purchase o 
expendable supplies, with no more than $5,000 to be expended by the Historical Commission from monie: 
transferred into said fund during FY 201 1, with the source of such funds being the sale of publications sue ' 
as replicas of the Declaration of Independence and other historical documents; and 

(3) A Health Division Revolving Fund, the use of said fund to Finance additional part-time help in the Healtl 
Division and to pay related expenditures with no more than $7,000 to be expended by the Health Division 
in FY 201 1 from funds transferred into said fund during FY 201 1, with the source of such funds being 

housing code inspection fees; and 

I 

(4) A Health Department Public Health Revolving Fund, to be funded through Medicare Part B 
reimbursements, the use of said fund to cover the costs of administering influenza and pneumococcal 
vaccines with no more than $10,000 to be expended by the Health Department from monies transferred inl 
the Public Health revolving fund during Fiscal 201 1; and 

(5) A Shellfish Department Revolving Fund, to be funded through a surcharge of $50 on commercial 
shellfish licenses, the use of said fund to enhance the shellfish resources of the Town under the guidance o 
the Shellfish Advisory Board and Town Manager with no more than $15,000 to be expended from the 
Shellfish Department Revolving Fund during Fiscal 201 1; and 



21 



6) A Facilities Department Revolving Fund, to be funded from fees charged to users of Town Hall facilities, 
the use of said fund to pay for custodial and other services associated with the use of the gymnasium and 
other Town Hall facilities by outside organizations and for special events sponsored by municipal 
departments. No more than $20,000 may be expended from the Facilities Department Revolving Fund 
from monies transferred into the fund during Fiscal 201 1 . 

ARTICLE 17 ASCENSION CHURCH PARKING LOT EASEMENT 

)n Motion of Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, it 
Carried to postpone this article indefinitely 
ARTICLE 18 WETLANDS PROTECTION BY-LAW AMENTMENT 

)n Motion of Charles D. Surpitski, duly seconded, it 

Carried by a Voice Vote to: 

unend Section 4 "Filing Procedure" of Chapter XVIII "Ipswich Wetlands Protection By-Law" of the General 
{ylaws by deleting, at the end of the first sentence of the third paragraph thereof, the phrase "up to a maximum 
f one thousand dollars ($1000.00)." and inserting a period after the word "Applicability" in that sentence. 

ARTICLE 19 POSTING OF WARRANTS 

)n Motion of Ingrid F. Miles, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to: 

unend the Town By-laws, Chapter II, Section 3 (b) "Warrants' which reads: 

All warrants for town meetings, except notices of adjournment, shall be served by posting attested copies 
lereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, and by publication in a newspaper 
ublished, or having a general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich at least seven days prior to the time for 
olding the Annual Town Meeting and at least fourteen days prior to the time for holding any Special Town 
Meeting. " to read as follows; 

All warrants for town meetings, except notices of adjournment, shall be served by posting attested copies 
lereof in the Town Hall and in at least one public place in each precinct and by publication in a newspaper 
ublished, or having a general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich, at least seven days prior to the time for 
olding the Annual Town Meeting and at least fourteen days prior to the time for holding any Special Town 
Meeting. Newspaper publication shall not be required for warrants solely related to elections." 

iRTICLE 20 WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT UPGRADE 

)n Motion of Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, it 

Carried Unanimously to: 

vuthorize the Treasurer to borrow $1.8 million for the purchase of equipment for the construction and 
ehabilitation of the sludge dewatering facilities at the Wastewater Treatment Plant; and to raise this 

22 



appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Wastewater Commissioners, to 
issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, as amended. 

ARTICLE 21 FEOFFEES TRUST 

On Motion of Richard F. Howard, duly seconded, it 
Carried to: 

Request that the School Committee continue its action in Probate, Court seeking to modify the Trust establishin 
the Feoffees of the Grammar School as the governing board of the Trust to establish a publically appointed 
board to replace the current privately appointed board which includes three Selectmen serving ex.officio; and 
further, to encourage a resolution of the Feoffees litigation with Little Neck residents that fully protects the 
interests of the Ipswich Public Schools and the Town of Ipswich; and further, to request that the School 
Committee proceed in consultation with other Town bodies including the Board of Selectmen and the Finance ! 
Committee. 



ARTICLE 22 


RECONSIDERATIOIS 


On Motion of Patrick J. McNally, duly seconded, it was 


| 


Voted Unanimously to: 


Postpone this article indefinitely. 


' 


Meeting adjourned at 12:15 AM, Wednesday, May 12, 2010 




Respectfully submitted, 




Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 




Town Clerk 


- ' • ' 





23 



RECORD OF ACTION TAKEN AT THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 25, 2010 

ursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the Town of Ipswich met in the Ipswich High 
ehool/Middle School Performing Arts Center in said town of Ipswich on Monday, October 25, 2010. A 
aorum being present (203 present - 200 required), the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. 
rthur James Grimes III, at 7:57 P.M. 

on-registered persons were given permission to attend the meeting as spectators and were seated on the floor 
i the back of the room on the left of the stage. 

ounters were Nathaniel Pulsifer, William Wasserman and Ann Wright. 

ARTICLE 1 PRIOR YEAR UNPAID BILLS 

MOTION was made by Charles Surpitski and duly seconded to: 

ppropriate $8,698.20 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid; 

CCOUNT VENDOR AMOUNT 

EGAL Anderson & Kreiger 5,01 1 .32 

nderson & Kreiger 152.00 

nderson & Kreiger 25.00 

OLICE Police Department 3,509.88 

8,698.20 

nd to meet this appropriation by transferring $8,698.20 from free cash. 

hhe Moderator declared that the MOTION CARRIED UNANIMOUSLY. 

URTICLE 2 FY'U TOWN BUDGET AMENDMENTS 

1 MOTION was made by Charles Surpitski and duly seconded to: 

'■ mend the Town's action taken under Article 4 of the May 1 1, 2010, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'l 1 
(unicipal Operating Budget) as follows: 

► To transfer from the Police Budget Salaries $220,917 to the newly established Civilian Dispatch Budget 
Salaries account; and 

I To transfer from the Police Budget Expenses $2,550 to the newly established Civilian Dispatch Budget 
Expenses account; and 

> To transfer $104,732 from free cash to the special Other Post Employment Benefits account (OPEB). These 
funds are from Federal Medicate Part D contributions and are transferred to the OPEB account as partial 
funding for other post employment benefits; 

) To amend its action under Article 4 of the May 1 1, 2010, Annual Town Meeting (the FY '1 1 Municipal 
Operating Budget) by amending the $14,191,874 Municipal Operating Budget by transferring $30,188 from 

24 



the Waterways Improvement Fund to the Harbormaster Budget leaving a net of $13,995,737 to be raised 
and assessed; and 

5) To appropriate $50,000 from the $1 00,000 reserved under the levy limit to the DPW Snow and Ice account 

So that the total Fiscal 201 1 Municipal Operating Budget of $14,191,874 as so amended and inclusive of 
override debt service, shall total $14,346,606 leaving the amount to be raised and assessed as $14,045,737. 

A MOTION to AMEND was made by Finance Committee Member, Richard Howard and duly seconded, to: I 

Appropriate $50,000 from the $100,000 reserved under the levy limit to the Finance Committee Reserve 
Account. 

The Moderator declared that the voice vote on the motion to amend was not that definitive and therefore, there 
would be a hand count. 

The Moderator declared that the hand count for the MOTION TO AMEND FAILED, 73 in favor and 
110 opposed. 

The Moderator declared that the MAIN MOTION carried on a VOICE VOTE. 

ARTICLE 3 FY'll SCHOOL BUDGET AMENDMENT 

A MOTION was made by Hugh O'Flynn, and duly seconded, to: 

Amend the Town's action taken under Article 5 of the May 1 1, 2010, Annual Town Meeting (the FY '1 ISchO' 
Operating Budget), as follows: 

1) To transfer $76,572 from free cash to reimburse the School Department for Medicaid funds deposited into 
the General Fund during Fiscal 2010; and 

2) To transfer $98,016 from free cash to the School Department to reimburse for the State School Building 
Authority's increase in reimbursements for the High School/Middle School project; and 

3) To transfer $126,277.95 from a special insurance account to reimburse the School Department for the cost 
of roof damage to the High School and Doyon School during the severe storm in February 2010. 

And further, 

To reduce the School Department budget by $50,551 due to the change in Chapter 70 funding for FY 201 1 tha 
occurred after the school budget was voted at the Annual Town Meeting so that the total Fiscal 201 1 school 
operating budget of $20,363,261, as so amended, shall total $20,613,575.95 leaving the amount to be raised ar 
assessed as $20,220,210. 

The Moderator declared that the MOTION carried UNANIMOUSLY. 

ARTICLE 4 FY 11 WH1TTIER REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL BUDGE 

A MOTION was made by Raymond Morley, and duly seconded, to: 

25 



iaise and appropriate the sum of $350,095 for the Town's share of the FY 2011 Annual Operating, 
Japital and Debt Service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District. 

Ihe Moderator declared that the MOTION carried UNANIMOUSLY. 

ARTICLE 5 FEOFFEES LITIGATION 

\ MOTION was made by Jamie Fay, and duly seconded, to: 

1. Request that the School Committee proceed in consultation with the Board of Selectmen and the 
Finance Committee to promptly take such actions in Probate Court to modify the Trust establishing the 
Feoffees of the Grammar School as the governing board of the Trust by establishing a publicly 
appointed board and to seek a resolution of the Feoffees litigation with Little Neck residents that fully 
protects the interests of the Ipswich Public Schools and the Town of Ipswich. 

2. Transfer $300,000 from free cash to a special legal account within the FY 201 1 municipal budget to pay 
for legal, real estate and other professional services required by the School Committee, Board of 
Selectmen and/or Finance Committee related to the Feoffees litigation and modification of the Trust 
creating the Feoffees of the Grammar School, the School Committee having agreed that the legal 
strategy will be determined by the School Committee in consultation with the Board of Selectmen and 
Finance Committee, and pursuant to a procedure devised by the three boards; and 

3. Establish a requirement that any funds expended from this account by the School Committee shall be 
repaid by the School Committee to the Town of Ipswich general fund as soon as possible, but not to 
exceed 3 years after receipt of the Feoffee disbursements to the School Committee which total or exceed 
the amount of such funds. 

4. The following MOTION to AMEND was made by Craig Saline, 13 Plum Sound Road, by inserting the 
following sentence, and was duly seconded: "Any expenditure of funds must be approved in advance by 
School Committee, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen." 

V MOTION to MOVE THE QUESTION was made by John Clark, 26 Oakhurst Avenue, and was duly 

econded. 

rhe Moderator declared that MOTION TO MOVE THE QUESTION FOR THE AMENDED MOTION 
'ASSED by a 2/3 voice vote. 

The Moderator declared that the AMENDED MOTION CARRIED, 100 in favor and 89 opposed. 

ohn Clark, 26 Oakhurst Avenue, questioned the quorum. Upon counting the voters in the auditorium there 
vere 179 registered voters. 

\ duly seconded motion was made by Mr. Clark to recess the meeting for twenty minutes. At the end of the 
wenty minute recess 172 registered voters were counted. 

"harles Surpitski made a motion, which was duly seconded, to adjourn the meeting and reconvene on October 
16, 2010, at 7:30 PM. at the Ipswich Performing Arts Center. 

26 



The Moderator declared that the MOTION to reconvene CARRIED. 

******************** 

The legal voters of the Town of Ipswich met in the Ipswich High School/Middle School Performing Arts Cente 
in said town of Ipswich on Tuesday, October 26, 2010. A quorum being present (215 present - 200 required), 
the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Arthur James Grimes, III, at 7:55 P.M. 

Non registered persons were given permission to attend the meeting as spectators and were seated on the floor 1 
in the back of the room on the left of the stage. Counters were John Grady, William Wasserman and William I 
Nelson. 

ARTICLE 6 A AMENDMENTS TO WETLANDS PROTECTION BY-LAV 

i 

A MOTION was made by William Craft, and duly seconded, to: 

Amend Section 2 of Chapter XVIII of the Town By-Laws (the Ipswich Wetlands Protection By-Law) to extenc: 
its jurisdiction of the Conservation Commission for the purpose of stormwater management by inserting at the 
beginning of the second paragraph thereof the following sentences: 

In any case where (i) a project or activity exceeds the review threshold contained in Section 5 of Chapter XIX 
(Stormwater Management) of the General Bylaws as may be amended, (ii) the project or activity does not 
require Site Plan Review, Definitive Subdivision or Special Permit Approval from the Planning Board, and (iii 
only a portion of that project or activity occurs within the above Resource Areas, the entire project or activity 
shall be subject to the requirements of Section 2. V.E "Stormwater Management" of the Rules and Regulation 
adopted pursuant to this By-Law as they may be amended from time to time. When acting thereunder, the 
Conservation Commission shall consult with the Department of Public Works regarding any proposed action." 
And by inserting the word "Otherwise" as the first word of the next sentence that now begins "Any activity 
proposed or undertaken. .. " 






The Moderator declared that the MOTION CARRIED BY A VOICE VOTE. 

ARTICLE 7 CONVERSION OF ACCESSORY BUILDING INTO RESIDENTIAL IJNI1 

A MOTION was made by Cathryn Chadwick, and duly seconded, to: 

Amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as set forth in Article 7 of the Warrant for the 
October 25, 2010, Special Town Meeting, with the following amendment: 

Revise "(3), P. 2. "Applicability" by adding a third sentence after the second sentence, said sentence to read as 
follows. "Three family dwellings in the IR District which satisfy the above Applicability requirements, but are 
unable to meet the dimensional requirements set forth in the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations in 
Section VI of this zoning bylaw, may also apply for a Planning Board special permit in compliance with the 
requirements of this subsection, provided that the Applicant satisfies at minimum the affordable housing 
requirement described in Section IX.I.3.a.(2) of this zoning bylaw. 

(Proposed changes shown by use of strikothrough for deleted language and bold italics for new language) 

(1) Amending Section "V.D. Table of Use Regulations" as follows: 



27 



a. under the "Residential" heading, for the principal uses "Single-family detached dwelling", "Two- 
family dwelling", "Multi-family dwelling" and "Multi-family residential development", remove 
footnote "23" as shown below; 

b. under the "Residential" heading, for the principal use "Multi-family dwelling", under the IR District 
column, add footnote "18" as shown below; and 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 



PRINCIPAL USE 



DISTRICT 



w 



w 



TTT 



W 



W 



Residential 



RRA 



RRB 



RRC 



IR 



GB 



w 



CB 



16 



HB 



PC 



16 



mr 



LI 



w 



Single-family detached 
dwelling 

(Amended 10/15/01 
10/23/01 and 10/18/04 
STM,; A.G. 2/19/02, 
1/27/05) 



18,3* 



,18,3* 



1 18,3* 



Two-family dwelling 
(Amended 10/15/01 , 
10/23/01, and 10/19/09 
STM, AG 2/19/02 and, 
2/16/10) 



,18,3* 



SBA 1 



SBA 



IX 



SBA 1 



w 



Multi-family dwelling 
(Amended 10/18/04 and 
10/19/2009 STM; 
1/27/05 AG, 2/16/10) 



SPB 7 

8. 
20.3* 



SPB 

20 



SPB 

20 



SPB 

20 



Multi-family residential 
development 30 (Added 
10/17/05 STM; 12/12/05 
AG) 



SPB 

20,3* 



SPB 

20 



SPB 

20 



SPB 

20 



2) Amending Section "V.D Footnotes to Table of Use Regulations" as follows: 

a. Revise footnote "18." to read as follows: 

"18. Not more than one principal building per lot, except as allowed in multi-family residential 
developments and except for permitted uses in the IR and RRA District as provided in footnote 23 
section IX. P."; 



b. Delete footnote "23." in its entirety, and substitute in lieu thereof "23. Reserved." as follows: 

"23. Reserved. By special permit, the Planning Board may allow two principal buildings on a lot, 
provided that the lot contains: (a) only one existing single family, two family or throe family 
dwelling at the time of application; and (b) the proposed additional single family detached dwelling 
is located entir e ly within the envelope of an accessory building in e xistenc e on the effectiv e date of 
this footnote, and not substantially altered subsequent to the effective date, except for appurtenances 
r e lated to the conversion of a non residential building to a dwelling unit, or exterior changes that, in 
the opinion of the Planning Board, enhanc e the historical or architectural character of the building. 
In considering the special permit application, the Planning Board will not find that the proposal 

28 



sati s fies tho special permit criterion 'Social, economic, or community needs served by the proposal' 
(Section XI. J. 2. a.), unless the applicant provides a mechanism to achieve long term affordability. 
To the extent feasible, the Planning Board may provide, or caus e th e Town to provid e , a financial 
sub s idy to assist th e applicant in satisfying this objectiv e . " ; and 

(3) Adding to section " IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS ", a new subsection "P. Conversion of Accessory 
Building into Residential Unit", said subsection to read as follows: 

"P. Conversion of Accessory Building into Residential Unit 

1. Purpose: 

The purpose of this subsection is to: 

a. Allow more efficient use of existing buildings and infrastructure in the IR and RRA districts. 

b. Increase the housing stock in existing neighborhoods to provide a mix of housing that responds 
to changing family needs and smaller households. 

c. Increase the supply of affordable housing without significantly changing the character of 
existing residential areas. 

d. Encourage the preservation and maintenance of historically and architecturally significant 
accessory buildings by permitting their adaptive reuse for residential purposes. 

2. Applicability : 

An existing accessory building in existence on the effective date of this Section IX. P, and not 
substantially altered subsequent to the effective date, and located on a lot where the primary building is 
a single-family or two-family residential dwelling in the IR or RRA district, may be converted to a 
dwelling unit upon issuance of a special permit by the Planning Board in compliance with the 
requirements of this subsection. 

3. Community Benefit : 

The Planning Board shall not grant a special permit under this subsection unless the applicant can 
provide a community benefit as determined by the Board. 

a. Any conversion of an accessory building into a residential unit subject to a permanent 
affordability restriction shall be considered a community benefit. The definition of affordable 
housing shall be as provided in the zoning bylaw at the time of application, except that the 
Planning Board has the option to adjust the requirement provided that, at minimum, the 
proposed unit be affordable to a household earning no more than 80% of area median income. 

b. Other potential uses that the Planning Board may find to meet a community need are as follows: 

i. Use of the dwelling unit for a family member, provided that upon the unit being vacated 
by family, use of the unit shall only be continued as a residential dwelling if it is 
affordable housing as defined in 3. a. above. 

ii. Applicant pays, to the affordable housing trust, a fee in lieu of providing an affordable 
unit. The amount of the fee shall be determined by the Planning Board. 



29 



Hi. Preservation, renovation, and reuse of an accessory building determined by the Planning 
Board to have historical or architectural significance. 

4. Standards for Reuse: 

a. Building: Existing accessory buildings shall not be demolished. In very limited instances, the 
Planning Board may permit the demolition and reconstruction of an existing accessory building, 
provided that one of the following conditions is met: 

i. The building does not have historical or architectural significance as determined by the 
Planning Board, and due to the condition of the building, replacement is more 
economically feasible than renovation. Additionally, the applicant shall be required to 
provide plans for replacement of 

a building that is in keeping with the principal building on the lot, as well as other 
existing buildings in the neighborhood. 

ii. If the building does have historical or architectural significance, as determined by the 
Planning Board, the Board must find that reconstruction is the only economically or 
physically feasible way of preserving it. Additionally, the building must be reconstructed 
in a manner that does not, in the opinion of the Planning Board, diminish its historical or 
architectural significance. Reconstruction can involve, but is not limited to, replication of 
the original building. 

b. Building site: Conversion of the accessory building shall take place on the existing building 
footprint unless the Planning Board determines it is in the public interest that the building be 
relocated within the lot boundaries. Instances in which the public interest might be served by 
relocation include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following: 

i. Current building encroaches on required setback. 

ii. Relocation does not result in a building moving any closer to existing buildings on 
abutting properties. 

Hi. The visual impact of the building on abutting properties is reduced or abutters ' views are 
improved by the relocation of the accessory building. 

c. Building envelope: Renovations to the building will be limited to the current envelope except as 
follows (for the purposes of this subsection, envelope is defined as the three-dimensional space 
within which a building or building is permitted to be built on a lot and which is defined by 
regulations governing building setbacks and maximum height and bulk.): 

i. Dormers, landing areas, stairs or other similar appurtenances related to the conversion 
of a non-residential building to a dwelling unit, provided that the appurtenances are 
either required by the building code, or deemed necessary by the Planning Board to 
provide sufficient living space for the occupants. 

ii. Exterior changes that, in the opinion of the Planning Board, enhance the historical or 
architectural character of the building. 

Hi. For expansions otherwise allowed by right if the accessory building was not being 
converted. 

30 






iv. If a proposed conversion satisfies i., ii., or Hi. above, the Planning Board may allow the 
building to be extended beyond the existing envelope subject to the following conditions. 

(1) The building does not encroach any further than it currently does on property 
lines or setbacks, except as it relates to the primary dwelling. 

(2) For buildings determined by the Planning Board to have historical or 
architectural significance, there is no adverse affect on the historical or 
architectural value of the building. 

(3) The change does not substantially alter the visual impact of the building on 
abutting properties. 

(4) In no instance shall the size of the accessory building be increased by more than 
15% of its current size, including any appurtenances pursuant to c.i. and c.ii. 
above. 

5. Special Application Process : 

All special permit applications shall be made and filed on the appropriate application form. For an 
application to be considered complete, it shall provide all information required by the Rules and 
Regulations Governing Granting of Special Permits, available from the Department of Planning and 
Development. The Board shall hold a public hearing on the application within thirty (30) days of its 
receipt. 

6. Additional Conditions and Considerations 

a. Limitation of subdivision: No lot shown on a plan for which a permit is granted under this 
section may be further subdivided. 

b. Deed restriction: Except when the Planning Board determines that a fee shall be paid in lieu 0j 
an affordable housing restriction per 3.b.ii. above, or an accessory building has historical or 
architectural significance and is being preserved, renovated and reused, per 3.b.iii., a deed 
restriction will be placed on the property to ensure that the affordability of the accessory 
dwelling unit is maintained. 

c. Monitoring: Applicant will be required to submit to the Planning Board, on an annual basis, a 
letter confirming that the building converted by special permit under this provision is currently 
occupied by a family member or being used as an affordable dwelling unit if applicable 

d. Mixed use: Certain non-residential uses permitted in the bylaw may be allowed in the accessor 
building. 

e. Design Review Board: The Planning Board may request a consultation with the Design Review 
Board concerning the 
conversion of an accessory building to a dwelling unit as specified in this subsection." 

Moderator declared that the MOTION CARRIED BY MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE, 172 in favor and 56 
opposed. 

31 



ARTICLE 8 MISCELLANEOUS ZONIN G CHANGES 

\ MOTION was made by Suzanne Benfield, and duly seconded, to: 

Amend the Protective Zoning By-laws as printed in Article 8 of the Warrant. 

\ MOTION was made by Suzanne Benfield to DIVIDE THE QUESTION by first moving that portion of the 
3roposed amendment, as printed in the warrant, except for, section 1(a) (Definitions), the portion of Section 2 
/under Accessory Uses) and Section 6(b) (Home Occupations). 

The Moderator declared that the MOTION TO DIVIDE THE QUESTION PASSED by a voice vote 

\ MOTION was made by James Engel, 362 Linebrook Road, to indefinitely postpone the first part of the 
divided question. Mr. Engel made a motion to move the question on the motion for indefinite postponement. 

The Moderator declared a vote in the AFFIRMATIVE to move the question; the MOTION for indefinite 
30stponement of the first part of the divided question CARRIED. 

\ MOTION was made by Timothy Purinton, and duly seconded, to: 

\mend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as set forth in Article 8 of the Warrant for the 
Dctober 25, 2010, Special Town Meeting as follows: 

1) Amending Section "III. DEFINITIONS " as follows: 

Proposed changes shown by use of strik e through for deleted language and bold italics for new language) 

a. Add, in the correct alphabetical sequence, definitions of "AGRICULTURE", "AQUACULTURE", 
"KENNEL", "RIDING ACADEMY", "STABLE" and "VITICULTURE", said definitions to read as 
follows; 

"AGRICULTURE: Farming in all its branches and the cultivation and tillage of the soil; dairying; 
the production, cultivation, growing and harvesting of any agricultural, floriculture or horticultural 
commodities; the raising of livestock including horses; the keeping and raising of poultry, swine, 
cattle and other domesticated animals used for food purposes; bees; fur-bearing animals; and any 
practices, including any forestry or lumbering operations performed by a farmer, who is hereby 
defined as one engaged in agriculture or farming as herein defined"; 

"AQUACULTURE: The science, art, and business of cultivating marine or freshwater food fish or 
shellfish such as oysters, clams, salmon, and trout, under controlled conditions.'''; 

"KENNEL: A single premises with a collection of eight (8) or more dogs three (3) months or older 
that are maintained for any legal purpose, or where four (4) or more litters per year are raised, or 
where the boarding or grooming of dogs is performed as a business." 

"RIDING ACADEMY: An establishment where horses are boarded and cared for and where 
instruction in riding, jumping and showing is offered and the general public may, for a fee, hire 
horses for riding"; 



32 



"STABLE: Livery, boarding or riding stables for four (4) or more horses which may include facilh 
for showing and training horses"; 

"VITICULTURE: The cultivation of grapes.", 

b. Revise the definition of "MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT" to read as follov 

"MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT: A lot which contains or has built upon it: (a) o 
or more multi-family dwellings; (b) one or more multi-family dwellings and one or more single or two- 
family dwellings, provided that the single family dwellings constitute no more than 25% of the total uni h 
the residential development, or (c) two (2) or more two-family dwellings."; 

(2) Amending Section "V.D. Table of Use Regulations" as shown below: 



PRINCIPAL USE 


DISTRICT 




RRA 1 


RRB 1 


RRC 1 


IR 16 


GB 16 


CB 16 


HB 16 


PC 16 


i I6 lF* 


Wholesale, Transportation & Industrial 


Research offices or establishments 
devoted to research & development 
activities (Amended 10/20/08 STM; 
1/28/09 AG) 










SBA 21 


SBA 2 ' 


SBA 21 


SBA 2 ' 


SBA^ 


SBA : 


Enclosed manufacturing or 
processing Enclosed 
manufacturing of a product 
including processing, blending, 
fabrication, assembly, treatment 
and packaging 35 (Amended 
10/15/07 STM; 1/23/08 AG) 










SBA 


SBA 


SBA 


SPB 


P 


P 


ACCESSORY USE 


DIST1 


RICT 


(cont'd) 


RRA 1 


RRB 1 


RRC 1 


IR 16 


GB 16 


CB 16 


HB 16 


PC 16 


I 16 


LI 16 


Manager's unit in hotels, motels, 










SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SP 
B 




inns, 


SPB 




SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 




SP 
B 




bed & breakfast 

establishments, 




SPB 




SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 




SP 
B 


assisted living or life 
care facility, 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 










campground, 


SPB 


— ■ 


SPB 


— 


— 


— 


SPB 


— 


— 


— 


and mini-storage warehouses 
(Added 10/15/01 STM; 
2/19/02 AG) 










SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SP 
B 


SP 
B 


use related to agriculture, 
aquaculture, floriculture, 
horticulture, silviculture or 
viticulture 


SPB 




SPB 








SPB 


SPB 




SP 
B 



(3) Amending Section "V.D Footnotes to Table of Use Regulations" by adding footnote "35.", to read as 
follows: 



33 



"55. This includes the manufacture of products associated with alternative and renewable energy. For 
the purposes of this subsection, alternative energies include combined heat and power, and electric 
and hydrogen powered vehicles and associated technologies including advanced batteries and 
recharging stations. Renewable energies include solar - photovoltaic (PV) and thermal, wind, 
biomass power conversion or thermal technologies including the manufacture of wood pellets, ultra 
low emissions high efficiency wood pellet boilers and furnaces, low impact 

hydro - electric and kinetic, ocean thermal, wave or tidal, geothermal, landfill gas, fuels cells that 
use renewable energy, and advanced biofuels."; and 

\) Amending Section "VLB. Footnotes to Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations", by revising 
jotnote "1 ." to read as follows: 

"1. Except in the Rural Residence C, the Planned Commercial, and the Limited Industrial Districts, no 
building in any district need have a front setback greater than the front setback of the principal building(s) 
existing on the premises as of the effective date of this provision, or the average front setback of the 
principal buildings on abutting lots within 250 feet of each lot line facing the same street and located 
within the same area or district, whichever is less restrictive, located on the stre e t on both sid e s within a 
distance of 500 f e et. In determining such average, a vacant lot having a frontage of at least eighty (80) feet 
shall be considered to have a front setback conforming to the requirements of this bylaw."; 

5) Amending Section "VIII. SIGNS " as follows: 

a) Revise "C. Definitions" by: 

1 . Amending the definition of "SIGN" by renumbering "6." and "7." to "7." and "8.", respectively; 
adding a new paragraph "6.", to read as follows: 

"Off-Premises Sign: Any sign which advertises or announces a use conducted, or goods 
available elsewhere other than on the lot where the sign is located.", 

2. Revising the definition of "TEMPORARY SIGN," paragraph l.c.(l)" to read as follows: 

"c. Real Estate sign: 

(1) shall be related to sale, rental, or lease of same lot 

(2) shall not be more than four (4) six (6) square feet in area."; and 

b) Revise "D. Sign Requirements per Zoning District" by: 

1. Amending paragraph "3." to read as follows: 
. In Highway Business and Planned Commercial Districts, the following signs are permitted: (Amended by 
0/20/03 STM, approved by AG 1/22/04) 

a. all signs listed in D.l. a through f; 

b. one banner sign; 

c. one wall sign . . .per business; 

d. one free-standing directory sign ...; 

e. Off-premises, free-standing signs T may be permitted by special 

permit from the Planning Board £each such sign of which shall 
have an area of no not b e more than two (2) square feet per business or institution 
identified on the sign. Up to six (6) separate businesses or institutions may be 
advertised on one sign for up to twelve (12) square feet of combined area, twenty (20) 
squar e f ee t in area may b e permitted by special permit;'; " 

34 



c) Adding a new paragraph 6.c. to read as follows: 

"6. In all districts the following additional signs are permitted: 

a. any free-standing sign . . . ; 
b. one sign attached to the building wall...; 
"c. additional wall sign(s), conforming to the size specifications in subsection D. 2. 

through D. 5. above, on each secondary frontage, if a building has frontage on mon 

than one (1) public street, or public entrances on more than one (I) facade. 

However, no business or other establishment shall have more than two (2) such 

secondary wall signs"; and 

2. Amending paragraph 8. to read as follows: 

"Signs proposed in conjunction with a d e v e lopm e nt r e quiring sit e plan approval or Planning 
Board s pecial p e rmit may, by Planning Board special permit, be increased in size and numb e r 
from the requirements of this subsection D. , as follows: (a) permitted ugcg in the non rosidonti 
districts that contain only on e us e in a building may b e allow e d up to two wall signs, provid e d 
that th e total squar e footag e do e s not e xc ee d what is oth e rwis e p e rmitt e d by mor e than tw e nty 
fiv e (25%) p e rc e nt; (b) in no e v e nt may th e allowabl e maximum sign s iz es b e incr e a se d by mor 
than fifty (50%). where this will not be incongruous with the surroundings, based upon 
consideration of the following: 

a. The number of occupants and signs per building, 

b. The size of the building and integration of sign and building design, 

c. The character of the proposed sign, its relationship with the building and size of the 
building, 

d. The subject matter of the sign, 

e. The impact of the sign on abutting streets and property owners, 

f Such other factors that the Planning Board deems appropriate to give assurance that 

the public interest will be protected"; and 

(6) Amending Section "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS ", subsection "4." as follows: 

a) Revise "G. Wireless Communications Facilities" by amending paragraph "4b." as follows: 

"4. Performance Standards/General Requirements 

The following performance standards and general requirements shall apply to all WCFs: 

a. Compliance with Federal and State Regulations. . . 

b. Co-location (for the purposes of this subsection, co-location is defined as the mountin 
or installation of an antenna on an existing tower, building or structure for the 
purpose of transmitting and/or receiving radio frequency signals for communication 
purposes.) of WCFs. WCFs shall be designed to accommodate the maximum number o 
users technologically practical. Shared use of freestanding, building-mounted, or indoo 
WCFs by commercial carriers is required unless such shared use is shown to be not 
technologically practical . . . 

b) Revise "L. Home Occupations, paragraph 4." to read as follows: 

35 



"4. Prohibited Occupations/Activities 

The following occupations or activities are expressly prohibited as home occupations: 

a. servicing, maintenance, or restoration of motor vehicles 

b. trucking or warehousing activities 

c. ongoing retail, show windows or displays 

d. sale of articles, except as provided in 3. above 
e-. commercial stables or konnols 

£ e. animal hospital 

gr/ medical or dental clinics 

«t g. bakery 

ir h. bed and breakfast home or establishment"; and 

d) Revise "N. Requirements for Uses Involving Hazardous and Toxic Materials", paragraph 3.d. to read as 
follows: 

"d. In addition to reporting, owners or operators of any use registered in accordance with this subsection 
shall maintain on the premises an inventory, reconciled on a quarterly basis, of purchase, use, sale 
(excluding sales made 

in the ordinary course of business) and disposal of hazardous materials. After one (1) year of 
operation, the Planning Board may, by special permit, allow reconciliation less frequently than 
quarterly, but in no instance shall reconciliation occur less than once per year. "; and 
Amending Section "X. SITE PLAN REVIEW " as follows: 

a. Revise "D. Submission Procedure" as follows: 

• Revise paragraph "2." to read as follows: 

"2. The Board shall hold a public hearing on the application within thirty (30) days of its receipt. 
Notice of the hearing shall be given by publication in a newspaper of general circulation in the Town 
once in each of two successive weeks, the first publication to be not less than fourteen (H) days 
b e for e th e dat e of th e h e aring, and by posting such notice in a conspicuous place in the Town Hall 
for a period of not less than fourteen (H) days b e fore the day of such hearing . In addition, notice of 
said hearing shall be sent by mail, postag e pr e paid, to all parti e s in interest as specifi e d in 
Massachusetts Gen e ral Laws, Chapter 4 0A, S e ction II. All costs for publication and notic e of the 
public hearing shall be borne by the applicant."; 

• Add paragraph "4.", to read as follows: 

"4. Site Plan Review is an administrative review process that does not provide the Planning 
Board with discretionary power to deny the proposed use. As such, decisions rendered by the 
Planning Board are not appealable except at the stage of issuance or denial of a building 
permit"; and 

b. Amend subsection "I. Compliance" as follows: 

+: Site plan revi e w approval granted under this Section shall lapse within two years of the date of 

approval if a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced. Such approval may, for good 

36 



causo, bo extended by the Planning Board upon tho writt e n roquost of tho applicant, provided that 
any application for extension is submitted before the two years have expired. 

2r /. Except as described in 2. below, no final occupancy permit shall be issued for any building or 

structure, or portion(s) thereof, until: 

a. The Building Inspector receives certification from a registered architect, engineer or land 
surveyor, that all construction, including utilities, has been done in accordance with the approved 
site plan; and 

b. The Building Inspector verifies that all conditions of the approved site plan 
have been met. 

3t 2. Occupancy permits may be issued for a portion of any building or structure, if 

The only incomplete work shown on the site plan is landscaping and/or roadway top course, and 
surety in an amount approved by the Planning Board is posted to ensure that the incomplete 
landscaping and/or roadway top course is completed within a reasonable time. The Planning Boar( 
may allow surety to be posted for site work in addition to landscaping and the roadway top course, 
an unusual or unexpected event prevents the applicant from completing the site work. 

c. Delete subsection "O. Appeal" in its entirety as shown: 

" O. App e al: Any appeal of the decision of the Planning Board under this section shall b e govern e 



by Massachusett s G e n e ral Laws, Chapt e r 40A, S e ction 17. "; 

The Moderator declared that the MOTION IN FAVOR OF THE MAIN MOTION CARRIED by a 2/3 
vote, 170 in favor and 56 opposed. 

A MOTION was made by Patrick McNally for RECONSIDERATION and duly seconded. 

The Moderator declared the MOTION FOR RECONSIDERATION FAILED, 96 in favor and 102 

opposed. 

I 

ARTICLE 9 NORTH GREEN SIDEWALK EASEME? 

A MOTION was made by Raymond Morley, and duly seconded, to: 

(a) Authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the Massachusetts General Court, pursuant to Article 97 oft! 
Massachusetts Constitution, to approve the transfer of the two parcels of land shown as "SW-1" and "SW-2" 
on the plan entitled "Ipswich, North Main Street at Meetinghouse Green, Right of Way Plans Sheet 2 of 4," 
prepared by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc., dated 9-27-2010, a copy of which is on file in the office of the 
Town Clerk, with metes and bounds depicted on a plan entitled "Plan of land showing location of land transfe 
and Town alteration of North Main Street and Meetinghouse Green in the Town of Ipswich, Essex County, 
scale: 20 feet to the inch, Date: October 14, 2010," to the Board of Selectmen for sidewalk purposes, said 
parcels now being a portion of the parcel of land known as the North Green (further described as Parcel 292 o 
Assessor's Map 42A); 

(b) Approve the modification of the layouts of North Main Street to include the aforesaid parcels SW-1 and 
SW-2 as shown on said plan, and to exclude land no longer needed for public way purposes, said modificatiorj 
to take effect only upon the approval of the aforesaid petition by the General Court and the Governor; and 



37 



;) Approve the modification of the layout of Meetinghouse Green to exclude land no longer needed for public 
/ay purposes; and 

i) Assign the care, custody, and control of the remainder of the land known as the North Green, and to transfer 
le land now within the layout of North Main Street and Meetinghouse Green no longer needed for public way 
urposes, as shown on said plan, to the Parks and Cemeteries Commission for park purposes. 

i he Moderator declared the MOTION CARRIED UNANIMOUSLY. 

kiRTICLE 10 LAND SWAP WITH EBSCO AT COMMUTER RAIL STATION 

V MOTION was made by Charles Surpitski, and duly seconded, to: 

o authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey 153 square feet of Town owned land (Lot 49 on Assessor's Map 
; 2C), near the entrance/exit to the commuter station parking lot to EBSCO (Lot 194 on Assessor's Map 42A), 
i exchange for 477 square feet of land owned by EBSCO that will be conveyed to the Town. 

i he Moderator declared that the MOTION CARRIED. 

ARTICLE 11 COMMUNITY SEPTIC MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

V MOTION was made by Patrick McNally, and duly seconded, to: 

laise and appropriate the sum of $1,000,000 by borrowing from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement 
>ust, pursuant to MGL, Ch. 29c, for the purpose of funding the Town's program to repair, replace or upgrade 
eptic waste disposal systems. 

\ MOTION TO INDEFINITLEY POSTPONE, this article was made by Michael Schaff, Finance 
"ommittee member, and was duly seconded. 

Phe Moderator declared that the MOTION TO INDEFINITELY POSTPONE FAILED, 72 in favor and 
19 opposed. 

The Moderator declared that the MAIN MOTION PASSED, 128 in favor and 56 opposed. 

ARTICLE 12 SENIOR TAX DEFERRAL PROGRAM 

V MOTION was made by Patrick McNally, and duly seconded, to: 

leduce the interest rate assessed under the Senior Tax Deferral Program (MGL, Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 
HA) from eight (8) percent to four (4) percent, such change to be effective for deferrals granted for taxes 
issessed for any fiscal year beginning on July 1, 201 1. 

The Moderator declared that the MOTION CARRIED UNANIMOUSLY. 

ARTICLE 13 ACCEPTANCE OF STATE LEGISLATION: SUNDAY ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 
SALES 

\ MOTION was made by Shirley Berry, and duly seconded, to: 

38 



Accept local option legislation: M.G.L. 138, 33B, as amended, which authorizes the Board of Selectmen, as tr 
Local Liquor Licensing Authority, to issue licenses allowing licensees to sell alcoholic beverages starting at 1 
a.m. on Sundays and certain legal holidays. 

The Moderator declared that the MOTION PASSED, 118 in favor and 61 opposed. 

ARTICLE 14 RECONSIDERATIO 

A MOTION was made by William Craft, and duly seconded, to: 

Postpone action on this article indefinitely. 

The Moderator declared that the MOTION CARRIED UNANIMOUSLY. 

Meeting adjourned at 10:30 PM on October 26, 2010. 

Respectfullv submitted, 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC/CMC Town Clerk 



39 



30ARD OF SELECTMEN 

Charles D. Surpitski, Chairman 

)n behalf of the Board of Selectmen, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you, the citizens of Ipswich, 
or joining with your elected officials in making our Town one of the best small towns in America. We can be 
>roud of our continued achievements to maintain and improve the quality of community life. 

Hiis past year has been, at times, challenging and exciting. Your Board of Selectmen accomplished much and, 
is importantly, laid the groundwork for the accomplishment of future projects. I am indebted to my colleagues 
>n the Board, Patrick McNally, Raymond Morley, and our newly elected Selectmen Shirley Berry and William 
"raft for all their contributions and hard work. I would also like to acknowledge and thank former Selectmen 
Elizabeth Kilcoyne and Ingrid Miles who chose not to seek re-election at the end of their terms in May of 2010 

Vs in the past, the goal of the Board is the responsible management of our fiscal resources. I am pleased to 
eport that the Town lived within its budget without seeing any drastic cuts in services. It is a tight budget. We 
iccomplished this by looking for savings, such as in the cost of trash disposal and recycling, working with our 
mployees to construct fair and equitable collective bargaining agreements that benefited both the town and the 
:mployees, and other cost saving measures. As I write this on the 30 th of March, one great example of prudent 
iscal management is that for the first time in many years we were able to present a snow and ice abatement 
mdget that, despite one of the snowiest winters on record, finished the winter season in the black, so far. 
-lowever predicted snow on April 1 may create a shortfall. 

Taring for and preserving those special places in our Town has long been one of the finest traditions in Ipswich. 
Through the combined efforts of our federal and state governments, and private trusts joining with the Town, 
ve have preserved Maplecroft Farm forever. The approximately 247 acres of this farmland will forever remain 
n its present undeveloped state and will serve as one of the many gifts we pass to the future generations of 
esidents. 

: rom the earliest reported times of our Town, shell fishing has always played a huge role. After nearly 18 
nonths of study, conducted by the Shellfish Advisory' Board, the Board of Selectmen received 
ecommendations as to the future role of private aquaculture on our clam flats. It was the Board's decision to 
mplement conservative, carefully drawn, and tightly regulated shellfish farming. It is hoped that these projects, 
:ombined with an aggressive public shell fishing enhancement program, will contribute greatly to the continued 
/lability of the resource. Also, significant improvements were made to the Eagle Hill landing which is the 
)arking area for the majority of commercial clammers. 

The Board is pleased to report that, after significant delays, we will soon have a wind turbine producing 
electricity at the end of Town Farm Road. It is anticipated that, by the time this report is in your hands, the 
urbine will be spinning. We also sought and received a grant that was combined with the conservation budget 
)f the electric department to place solar panels on the roof of Town Hall. We also continue to seek all 
)pportunities to add more green power to our purchased electricity portfolio. 

n early June of 2010, the Board submitted a proposal that was approved by the Federal Railroad Administration 
hat will permanently establish a "Quiet Zone" on all railroad crossings in the Town. In addition to preventing 
he disturbing effects of the sounding of train horns throughout the corridor, the plan also significantly 
mproved the safety of our citizens traversing the crossings by vehicle or foot. Assisted by a dedicated group of 
/olunteers, we were able to accomplish this at significantly reduced costs compared to what we initially 
inticipated. 

40 



The Board continues to wait for a determination from the state relative to providing funds for the completion c 
the Central/South Main Street project. Significant work remains to be done, including the installation of storm 
water infrastructure that will improve the cleanliness of storm water discharged into the Ipswich River. Town 
staff remains confident that we will eventually be awarded these funds, which will allow local tax dollars to bi 
used for other badly needed street improvements. This is important to the health of our river and shellfish flats 

After its reorganization last June, the Board of Selectmen decided to pursue two exciting changes to its agend; 
The first was to set aside a meeting each month to hear reports and study major issues facing our Town. These 
sessions included: discussion of construction of a much needed public safety facility; the future of the open 
space acquisition program; the need for athletic fields; the role of the Planning Board; affordable housing; a 
formal education outreach program to be conducted by the Conservation Commission; and others. The seconc 
initiative was to have each of the Town's departments appear before the Board and report on their duties and 
initiatives. Both have been extremely worthwhile and informative, both to the Board and the citizens. 

The Town is fortunate to have in their employ many wonderful dedicated employees who go above and beyor 
the call of duty to serve you. The Board is grateful for their service and "can do" attitude. Of special note is th 
permanent appointment of the following department managers: Paul Nikas as our Chief of Police; Richard 
Clarke as our Department of Public Works Director; Jeffrey Putur as our Superintendent of Cemeteries and 
Parks; Frank Ventimiglia as our Department of Public Works Operations Manager; and Robin Nolan as our 
Chief Assessor. 

Many of the functions of our local government are performed by volunteers. We have over fifty committees 
comprised of citizens who are working to improve our community. They undertake studies, make 
recommendations, provide support to our departments and, in some cases, enforce regulations. The Board is 
grateful for their contributions. 

As we enter the next fiscal year, there are many challenges that will face the community. How to work more 
efficiently and more collaboratively with all branches of municipal services and the school department will b( 
constant topic. This will also include collaborating on a regional level to improve efficiencies and reduce cosl 
locally. We will face challenges in supporting costly infrastructure improvements, road reconstruction and 
maintenance, post employment benefits, the maintenance of present Town services, and the funding of 
initiatives that will improve the quality of the services rendered. Much needs to be done. The Board is confidi 
that, with the continued support of the citizens, coupled with their involvement, much will be accomplished. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Jamie M. Fay, Chairman 

Larry E. Seidler, Vice Chairman 

The mission of the town of Ipswich is to provide an exceptional quality of life for its citizens. We believe this 
achieved by providing strong schools, safe streets, quality human services and a well-maintained town 
infrastructure. With town revenues growing by a modest 1.5% this year, both the school and municipal budge 
were faced with considerable challenges and significant choices. 

With the slowing economy, new real estate growth in Ipswich has also slowed, mirroring the state trend. This 
significant because the Town's revenue is delivered through two main sources; the taxes and fees generated 
from our real estate. This income represents 87% of our annual revenue with state revenue disbursements 
providing the remaining 13% of our revenues. Therefore, as the economy slows, so too does our ability to 
increase operating revenue. 

41 



Phis trend towards modest revenue increases has required the town to budget conservatively and conduct a 
comprehensive examination of all services and expenses in an effort to reduce costs wherever practical. The 
7 inance Committee fully supports this approach, and expects that future year's revenue growth will continue to 
tagnate resulting in an inability to keep pace with staff salaries, benefits, the demand for new and expanded 
ervices, and ultimately sustained capital spending. As such, this year's annual assessment of priorities and 
capabilities will become an annual requirement. 

Respite our challenging financial situation and conservative budget approach, Ipswich continues to provide the 
ervices you have come to rely upon while investing in infrastructure improvements and protection of our 
natural treasures. This commitment to growth during financially precarious times enhances the daily experience 
if our residents while attracting both business and tourism, which will in turn support our revenue stream. To 
his end, the Town has invested in energy and environment conservation programs this year, including new 
:nergy efficient windows in Town Hall, new heating systems at the Library and Fire Stations, and a new town- 
vide recycle program that increases residential recycling collection from every other week to weekly. These 
nvestments will service the town for years to come. 

pswich Public Schools continued to attract and retain residents by providing an inclusive, quality educational 
xperience for our children. While all academic measurements have flaws, the Finance Committee feels that 
lie all Ipswich residents should have some means of identifying their school districts' educational quality. As 
uch, in 2010, 90% of Ipswich High School students were accepted into four and two year college programs 
pon graduation, and the Ipswich School district performed in the top 30% in the state on the MCAS (a required 
itate-wide exam). Additionally, Ipswich Athletic and Arts and Music programs continue to build upon past 
wards. 

\\s we have in past years, the Finance Committee remains steadfast in its commitment to working with both 
oards to ensure that the school children of Ipswich benefit fully and completely from the Feoffees of the 
irammar School trust. While this has proved to be a difficult and complex process, we remain committed to 
upporting a transparent and collaborative approach to reformation of the current trust and reinstatement of Mr. 
aine's intended revenue stream. 

"he Finance Committee is grateful for the opportunity to work with the Board of Selectmen and School 
Committee in serving the residents of Ipswich. The 2010 Finance Committee consists of: Janice Clements- 
kelton, Jamie Fay, Mitch Feldman, Richard Howard, Michael Schaaf, Larry Seidler, Marion Swan, Robert 
v'hite and Todd Wilson. 

OWN MANAGER 

lobert T. Markel, PhD. 

1 2010, Ipswich Town government continued to cope with the effects of the deepest economic recession since 
le Great Depression. The principal challenge for Town officials was to maintain quality services to residents 
nd businesses in the context of eroding property values and state aid. The revenue base for the town services 
/as stretched to the limit by a mandate from the Government Accounting Standards Board to fund the so-called 
)PEB liability, i.e., Other Post Employment Benefits. The effect of this new accounting standard is to require 
11 municipalities in the U.S. to carry the cost of health and other insurance benefits for retirees on its books and 
) begin a funding schedule to cover these post employment benefits over a thirty year period. In Ipswich, 
>PEB means that the Town must fund a $23 million accrued liability. Full funding of the OPEB liability will 
jquire the Town, Schools and Utilities Departments to set aside an additional $2 million annually to meet the 
bligation. 



42 



Like every other community in Massachusetts, the costs of health insurance and retirement benefits for 
municipal employees are rising well above increases in revenues and the rate of inflation. In Eastern 
Massachusetts, we have the best health care in the United States, but it is also the most expensive. Some steps 
were taken in 2010 to bring health insurance premiums under better control. The Town negotiated a switch to 
an incentive based system of co-payments where the beneficiary is encouraged to be a good consumer of healt 
services through variable co-pay rates. 

Highlights of 2010 include initiatives in energy conservation, regional cooperation and an expanded program 
for street reconstruction. Town officials worked with Hamilton and Wenham on a joint contract for trash 
disposal and recycling, including an option for recycling organic wastes. The Selectmen approved a modified 
"pay-as-you-throw" program that had the effect of reducing costs for trash collection and disposal by 27%. 

Regional cooperation in providing municipal services is now an overarching theme in local government. 
Financial pressures are forcing Massachusetts' fiercely independent cities and towns to band together in 
regional groupings to increase cost effectiveness and efficiency in municipal services. Ipswich has been 
involved with efforts to regionalize ambulance/EMS services; health services; and police and fire dispatch. 
Efforts at regional cooperation are likely to continue into for the foreseeable future in the interests of saving 
taxpayer dollars. 

Energy conservation efforts include completion of a three year program to replace the old and drafty window; 
at Town Hall and changing out the inefficient heating systems at the Library and Fire Department. A window 
replacement project at the Police Department is well underway. The Town received grants from the state for 
$150,000 and from the Electric Light Department for $100,000 to install 160 solar panels on the roof of Towt 
Hall. Solar energy is now supplying 30-35% of the electricity required to operate the building. Moreover, th« 
Electric Light Department has continued its broad based effort to promote conservation by businesses and 
residents through a program of free energy audits and distribution of free, energy saving light bulbs. 

The Department of Public Works embarked upon the first of three major road improvement programs in 201 C 
The DPW addressed the very poor condition of Central and South Main Streets and Market Street by grinding 
and adding a thin strip of new pavement that will provide a much improved surface for up to five years. New 
and permanent cross walks were installed for pedestrian safety. The Town is actively seeking federal funding 
through the greater Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization for the complete reconstruction of Central an* 
South Main Streets. This process is expected to take several more years, so the remedial work was necessary 
provide an acceptable road surface in the interim. 

All future street improvement projects will be fully coordinated with water line replacement and/or sewer 
improvements through the Utilities Department. Work on Washington Street is expected to begin in the 
summer of 201 1 and be completed the following year. The project includes new trees, sidewalks, curbing, 
drainage, and replacement of the water line and complete reconstruction of the road surface. Lastly, the Towi 
is well into the planning for a third major infrastructure project, the complete renovation of the North Green. 
Water line replacement, street and sidewalk replacement and new curbing are scheduled to begin in 2012. 

The Town Manager appointed several new department heads in 2010. Jeff Putur replaced Jim Graffum who 
retired as Superintendent of Cemeteries and Parks. Robin Nolan was appointed Chief Assessor following the 
retirement of Frank Ragonese. Rick Clarke became the new Director of the Department of Public Works and 
Frank Ventimiglia was hired as DPW Operations Manager. 

******** 



43 



i. 



•URCHASING DEPARTMENT 

rank V. Antonucci, Special Assistant to the Town Manager 

"he Purchasing Department oversees all goods and services expenditures and public construction work except 
Drall departments except the Electric Department and School Department. All goods and services expenditures 
ver $25,000 and all public works or building projects over SI 0.000 are subject to public bidding requirements 
nder Massachusetts General Laws. All bids and contract files are kept on file in the Purchasing Office. 

"he Purchasing Office also manages all insurance claims to the Town's insurance carrier including workers' 
ompensation, property damage claims including vehicles and injured on duty for police and fire fighters, 
isurance renewals, loss reports and property inventories are kept on file in the Purchasing Office . 

i addition to the present contract renewals, the following projects were put out for bid and contracts awarded: 
ehicle dispositions (3) wind turbine (3), appraisal services, legal services, employee insurance, Fire Dept. 
'entral Station roof, highway grade crossing improvements, electrician services, employee uniforms, audit 
srvices, substation landscaping, materials handling bucket truck, solid waste hauling and disposal, DPW snow 
ehicle purchase, 41 Pineswamp land sale, DPW chipper, street line painting, road resurfacing, sidewalk 
^placement, Town Hall windows phase III, Cleveland Ave. underground electrical project, catch basin 
leaning, Dow Brook Upgrades, road sand and salt, snow plow contracts and the Police Station roof repair. 

he Purchasing Office is also responsible for the compiling, editing, printing and the distribution of the Annual 

own Report. 

* * # * * # * * 

MEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 
OLICE DEPARTMENT 

aul Nikas, Chief of Police 

•aniel Moriarty, Executive Officer 

he year 2010 was a year characterized by continued transition and change for the Police Department. While it 
; true no additional officers retired this year, there were two new police officers hired to fill the last vacant 
'tiree spots on the Department. The hiring of Ofc. Brian Reed and Ofc Charles Ciccotelli filled two vacancies 
'ithin the Police Department roster that had remained vacant for months. During this same time period, Ofc. 
•rotherton graduated from the Basic Police Recruit Academy in June and enthusiastically joined the patrol 
)rce on the midnight shift. Upon her return to the patrol force, OFc Brian Reed was sent to his mandated Basic 
olice Recruit Academy in Plymouth upon Ofc. Reed's graduation in spring of 20 11. Ofc. Ciccotelli will be 
*nt to his mandated Academy. I have great confidence in each of these new officer's abilities and I believe that 
ley will serve the Town of Ipswich and its citizens with professionalism and compassion for many years to 
ame. 

am very pleased to note that our advances in Community Policing initiatives are still progressing despite the 
mited funding available for such programs. The Community Resource Unit continued to make its 
Dntnbutions known by once again hosting a CSI Camp for youths, participating in the "Fill-a-Cruiser" food 
rive, sponsoring a free movie night during the holiday seasons and assisting Ipswich Caring. In 2010 the Unit, 
'ith cooperation from the YMCA, added a Bike Safety Day for kids. In the coming summer, the Unit is looking 
) expand its free movie program to include a summer event. 



he Department Website continues to be expanded with added features, forms and provide more services to the 
eneral public. I urge our citizens to take a moment and check our site located at www.iDswiciiponcc.ore and 
rowse through each page. We'd also love to hear your feedback on the site or Department in general. I would 



44 



also encourage every citizen to sign up for the Department's free text message notification system called 
NIXLE. There's an icon on our main page to sign-up. This notification system is utilized when important 
information is in need of dissemination to citizens. This past year the system was used to notify citizens of 
traffic detours due to construction on Central St, traffic delays on the High St Bridge, and school cancellations 
due to winter storms. 

The D.A.R.E. program continues to expand at the elementary school level, thanks in part to Ofc Dan Kmiec's 
commitment to the curriculum and because of the commitment of the School Principals. Incidentally, Ofc. 
Kmiec was awarded the D.A.R.E. Officer of the Year Award in Massachusetts for 2010 as a result of his hard 
work and dedication in helping to re-write the D.A.R.E. curriculum for the State. The Department's 
"Prescription Drug Drop Off Box" located in the main lobby of the Police Department has become a great 
success. We have disposed of hundreds of pounds of unused drugs this past year. On one specific day in 
September, the Department joined forces with the District Attorney's Office, Drug Enforcement Agency and 
Police Departments all over New England for a highly advertised Drug Take-back Day! On that day alone, ov 
1 3 Tons of unused drugs were collected throughout New England and properly destroyed. I encourage each a 
every citizen to please use this free service, located in our lobby to dispose of any unused drugs properly. 

This past year saw the completion of our new radio system upgrade. This upgrade ensured the Department ha: 
communication system that is state of the art for the next decade and FCC narrow-band compliant two years 
before the mandated deadline. This upgrade ensures proper communication between officers anywhere in the | 
Town which is critical for officer safety. In addition, it allows our officers to communicate directly with ever 
Town Department (DPW, ELD, Forestry, Water, etc..) that provides services to the public. This ensures pro] 
communication during emergencies, and as such, we can direct the correct Department to the location of a 
citizen in need. 



As the 2010 statistics show, the men and women of the Police Department were once again very busy. The to 
calls for service have exceeded 13,500 for the first time in two years and for only the second time in the last s 
years. When you combine that data with the increase in disturbance calls(292) and assaults(38), I believe it 
demonstrates the strain our economic recession has caused the public. Citizens are feeling more strain 
financially and this strain has an impact on tolerance of others. Please remember and try to be courteous and 
understanding of each other. In addition, we have seen a dramatic increase in motor vehicle break-ins to leve 
never reached before. There were 61 motor vehicle breaks this past year, most of which were the result of car 
doors being left unlocked. Many of these thefts of opportunity can be prevented if citizens simply take a 
moment to lock their car doors. The most common answer from an arrested car break thief, when asked why 
they broke into the car, was simply, "the car was open." Please remember to lock your car doors and always 
take in any valuables to your residence. 

2010 Crime Statistics 



Adult Arrests/Summonses - 167 


Juvenile Arrests/Summonses - 5 


Assaults - 38 


Breaking & Entering - 30 


Assaults / Dangerous Weapons - 4 


Breaking & Entering Motor Vehicle - 61 


Domestic Complaints - 79 


Disturbances - 292 


Harassing Phone Calls - 55 


Malicious Destruction of Property - 42 


Larcenies - 97 


M/V Citations -1106 


ID Theft / Fraud - 33 


M/V Accidents - 242 


M/V Arrests - 64 


Suspicious Activities - 360 


OUI Arrests - 46 


Missing Persons - 13 


Medical Aids - 885 


Protective Custody - 6 


Alarms - 723 


Animal Related Calls - 250 


Total Calls for Service 


13,510 



45 










>IRE RESCUE SERVICES DEPARTMENT 
Arthur Howe III, Fire Chief 

! 1)10 was a year without any major (or multiple alarm) fire incidents in Ipswich and a remarkably low fire loss 
f $33,000. However, there were several very challenging events in the late winter including a town wide power 
utage in late February, and two periods of major river flooding in March. Fortunately, there were no injuries or 
italities from any of these and far less damage than in the floods of May 2006. 

1 'espite the continuing economic challenges, we were fortunate to retain our existing staffing and were very 
appy to bring on Firefighter Jeremy Dalton, formerly a Call Firefighter, as our newest career firefighter in July 
f 201 to fill one of two vacancies. Our newest Call Firefighter, Spencer Morse, completed the MA 
'epartment of Fire Services Regional Fire Training Class. 

*ur apparatus fleet continues to age and to require increasing maintenance. We were fortunate to have our 
rimary Linebrook station pumper, a 1990 KME, extensively refurbished for $25K under budget. We continue 
ur request for a new pumper so that we can retire a 3 1 year old reserve pumper. January saw the return of our 
-rial ladder, after extensive repairs from the 3 alarm fire of August 2009. 

/e continue to train, but we are increasingly challenged to bring outside training in due to budgetary 
3nstraints. Action Ambulance has been very cooperative with their continuing education for emergency 
ledical services. There are increasing opportunities for on line training across the spectrum of emergency 
srvices, but there is no substitute for practical, hands on training. We received a brand new set of hydraulic 
:scue tools for our primary pumper and were able to retire a set that was approximately 30 years old, thanks to 
ie grant writing efforts of Lt. Theriault. 

l October, the Department launched its new web site, vvwvv.ipswichfsre.org , thanks to Lt. Durrell who received 
valuable assistance from IPD Officer Copithorne. This web site is dynamic and is updated regularly. We hope 

^ou will use this resource and find it beneficial. 

che Public Safety Facilities Committee continues to meet regularly in the long term quest towards resolution of 
ie condition for our aging fire station, now 102 years old and with increasing maintenance demands. As the 
lolice station also has significant issues, the committee favors the construction of a joint public safety facility 

46 



and has met with both the Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee in their efforts to resolve this major 
issue. 

You can help us and yourselves using the following safety practices; 

1 ) Maintain your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, 

2) Ensure your house number is posted and highly visible from the street, 

3) Keep your closest fire hydrant visible and clear of snow, and 

4) Practice a home escape plan wherever you live. 

Let me take this opportunity to thank all the men and women of Ipswich Fire Rescue for their service to this 

community 

Town of Ipswich Fire Statistics 
Structure fires 7 

Medical/rescue: 804 

Mutual Aid Given 29 

Other hazardous responses: 82 

Other fires 28 

False alarms 263 

Hazardous material responses 33 

Miscellaneous responses 391 
Calls for service: 1637 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Arthur Howe III, Emergency Management Director 

The first few months of 2010 were challenging times for those involved with Emergency Management here. 
Late on February 25, a massive wind storm caused considerable local damage and left the entire town withou 
power for a period of time. Thanks to our Utility Department and several mutual aid line crews, most of the 
Town had power restored by the following day. Communicating with the public was a major challenge. Pleas 
help us and yourself by adding any cell phone numbers to our emergency notification system, accessible 
through the ConnectCTY link on www . i ps wich f "i re . org or through the Nixie link at the same address. Despite 
widespread damage related to downed trees, trees into buildings, and damages related to extensive power loss 
FEMA did not allow for reimbursement as this was such a localized event and did not meet the appropriate 
dollar loss threshold. 

Extensive rains in middle and late March caused extensive flooding of the Ipswich River, affecting numerous 
downtown businesses particularly. River heights were at their second highest recorded level ever for a multi c 
event. Fortunately, most businesses were far better prepared than previously, having learned from the 
devastating floods of May 2006. The Town did receive approximately $40,000 in reimbursements for damage 
and services incurred from these two floods. 

The Town was awarded grant funding for nearly $14,000 worth of emergency management supplies, which 
included a small 12' enclosed trailer to contain most of our emergency management equipment and which wi 
allow for mobility of supplies. 

We also received an additional $4,000 grant for Emergency Management Performance, which we have not ye 
spent but have discussed several options. 

Emergency Management continues to meet bi-monthly (July and August excepted) as a team representative o 
numerous town departments and to participate actively with the Northern Essex Regional Emergency Plannin 

47 



Dmmittee, comprised of 10 local towns. We encourage you strongly to visit the website, www.readv.20v 
;rsonal preparedness is everyone's responsibility, and this site has excellent information. Links to FEMA and 
lr State Emergency Management Agency are available through the Emergency Management tab on the Fire 
epartment web site above. 



******** 



NIMAL CONTROL 

att Antczak, Animal Control Officer 




1 1 2010, Animal Control TNR program had to release again only 2 cats back to their habitat due to cat's 
t Savior, but found homes for the another 54 cats and kittens. Our Safe Cat program which informs the public 
1 1 why it is healthiest and safest to keep or cats indoors is still being an informative success. With the help of 
t e Ipswich Chronicle and the I LOVE IPSWICH web site Animal Control is able to share information easier 
f ith the public. I am hoping for progress in creating a dog park in 201 1, fingers crossed even though the goal 
p as not fulfilled in 2009 or 2010. The Ipswich Humane Group shares the shelter with Animal Control and has 
*en excellent in finding happy homes for the cats that have come through. 

Town of Ipswich Animal Control Statistics 2010 



Licensed Dogs 


1989 


Dogs Picked Up 


107 


Dogs Picked Up After 


34 


Hours 




Dogs Adopted 


3 


Dogs Hit By Motor 


6 total 


Vehicles 


(only one survived) 


Dogs Quarantined Due to 




Biting Person or Other Dog 


14 


Barking Complaints 


29 


Cats Picked Up 


112 


Cats Returned to Owner 


5 


Cats/Kittens Adopted 


116 


Cats Hit By Motor Vehicles 


23 


Cats Issued Quarantines 


47 



48 



Wildlife Issues Calls 525 
Wildlife Removals From 

Residences 47 
Wildlife Removed From 

Roads After Being Hit 1 36 

Barn Inspections 91 

Loose Horse/Cow/Donkey 1 1 

Law Enforcement Citations 32 

HARBORS DEPARTMENT 

Paul A. Nikas, Chief of Police, Harbormaster 
Sgt. Thomas Colpitts, Harbors Supervisor 
Ptl. James Zabelski, Assistant Harbormaster 
Ptl. Eric Copithorne, Assistant Harbormaster 




The 2010 boating season began in early March with an overhaul of the Harbor Department's computer syster 
This new system provided improved tracking and documentation of current moorings and citizens on the 
mooring waiting list. In addition, it made the process of issuing mooring applications less cumbersome for th 
officers in the Department. New navigational buoys were added to the mouth of the Ipswich River and along 
river itself to help aid in proper navigation. As boaters are too aware, the Ipswich River is constantly changin 
her channel and continual adjustments throughout the boating season are necessary to prevent boaters from 
running aground. Assistance from the boating public is vital in this endeavor. Please notify the Assistant 
Harbormaster as soon as possible when an adjustment is necessary. 

This year, the waterways of Ipswich have, unfortunately, reached mooring saturation. Anyone looking for a 
mooring in the future will have to apply to the Mooring Waiting List unless they have direct waterfront 
property. In response to this, there was a significant increase in both daily launch permits and seasonal launcl 
permits being issued at the Town Wharf. When these launch permits are combined with the full complement i 
mooring permits issued, the result is an increase in boating activity on the waterways as well as an increase in 
the number of Harbor Patrol Boat calls for service. Some of these calls for service involved sinking vessels, 
capsized vessels, medical aids, improper operation of a vessel and vessels adrift. Assistance to the Ipswich 
Harbormaster was provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, Massachusetts Environmental Police, Crane Beach 
personnel, Ipswich Fire Department, other area Harbormasters and launch personnel from the Ipswich Bay 

49 



Yacht Club. It has been this cooperation between agencies and private entities that have ensured the waterways 
of Ipswich remained a safe and enjoyable experience for boaters. 

During June, the Harbors Department participated in a multi-agency training exercised to combat an 
oil/gasoline spill in Plum Island Sound. The training was sponsored by the Massachusetts Department of 
i Environmental Protection and focused on both small level spills and larger regional spills. The training included 
deployment of water booms to catch surface oil and the proper locations for those booms to be anchored during 
a real event. Additional agencies who participated in this training exercise were the Ipswich Fire, Essex 
Harbormaster, Rowley Harbormaster, Newbury Harbormaster, Mass Environmental Police, U.S. Coast Guard, 
Rowley Fire and Essex Fire. 

A.t the end of the boating season, the Harbormaster's Office received notification from the Department of 
Environmental Protection that our application for Ipswich Bay to be declared a "No Discharge Zone" had been 
approved. This federal designation means no vessel will be allowed'to discharge waste from on-board sanitation 
systems anywhere in Ipswich Bay. This designation, combined with our Federal Grant for the pump-out boat, 
,vill ensure our waterways retain their pristine condition into the future. Please be sure to utilize the pump-out 
)oat's free service. It is for the benefit of all boaters, clammers, fisherman and water enthusiasts that our waters 
emain clean. In the 2010 boating season, the pump out boat removed nearly 3,000 gallons of effluent from area 
vatercraft. 



2010 Harbor Department Statistics 




Mooring Permits issued 


937 


In-State Seasonal Launch Permits 


275 


Out of State Seasonal Launch 


6 


Permits 




Mooring Fees Collected 


$66,874 


In-State Daily Launch Permits 


606 


Out of State Daily Launch Permits 


31 


Launch Fees Collected Town 


$13,750 


Wharf 





HELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Icott LaPreste, Constable 
erry Smith, Deputy 
Iteve Price, Deputy 

010 started with record rainfall in the spring. This led to many, long rainfall closures. Summer proved to be 
xord dry and hot, with very long stretches of open harvesting. Autumn saw a return to normal rain and a mix 
f openings and closures. Early winter saw seasonable weather with the flats mostly open. Clam flats are 
ealthy and soft-shell clam harvesting remains relatively good. We are at the end of a Natural Cycle of clams 
lat renews every 7-10 years. Last large natural "seed in" of soft-shell clams was 2004. This Cycle came 10 
ears since the prior one and was one of the largest and strongest in a long time. Next estimated large "seed in" 
rojected to be in the next 3 years. 



50 



2010 Public Shellfish Enhancement Projects: 

All projects are paid for through enhancement fund that is funded by license fees. 

May Patterson's Road was repaired 

April-Oct. Green Crab Trapping 

June Nets manufactured for the coming juvenile clams we purchase from Salem State. 

September Eagle Hill Landing was improved and a new sign was installed. 

October 320,000 juvenile clams were purchased and planted under 20+ protective nets. 

December Patterson's landing was repaired. 

2010 Shellfish License Information 

Commercial 125 

Over 70 Commercial 13 

Resident Recreational 1 36 

Resident Family 153 
Out of Town 

Recreational 149 
Over 60 Free 

Recreational 31 



******** 



PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTORATE 

Richard W. Clarke, Director 

The Public Works Department is a customer focused service organization, dedicated to maintaining and 
improving the Town's infrastructure through the efforts of a professional Town work force, outsourced 
contracting and engineering consultants. With that as our operation, Public Works incorporates an on-going 
review of what we do and how we do it, with the intent of delivering high quality service to our customers ai 
enhancing the quality of life in our diverse community. Customer focus, continuous process improvement, 
human resource development, and resource management are the keys to our success. 

Public Works accomplished or is working on the following items in support of our mission: 

• Alignment of Public Works budgets, activity and resources with the expectations and goals of the To 
Manager and Board of Selectmen. 

• Provide technical input to Town boards and commissions on special permits, subdivisions, site plan 
reviews and commercial and residential development that impact Public Works' Operations and 
Maintenance (O & M) responsibilities and budget. 

• Established a Federal Railroad Administration Quiet Zone to maintain a quiet zone designation for a! 
public railroad crossings in Ipswich. Quiet zones are railroad crossings where trains will not blow 
warning horns upon approach due to increase safety measures at each crossing. 

• Continued to work through the Storm Water Management Plan to comply with the Phase II Storm W; 
Rules and Regulations of the Federal Clean Water Act while also investigating new methods and 
processes to follow to stay in compliance with the upcoming Phase II Storm water Permit. 

• Continued to use Vueworks which is a computerized work order system for all Public Works Divisio 
to track work orders and service calls. 

• Developed and implemented Operations and Maintenance plans for existing water quality structures 
installed for storm water management. 

• Use a pavement management plan to identify and schedule those roads most in need of roadway 
improvements and maintenance. 

51 



IGHWAY DIVISION 

uring the warmer months of 2010, the focus was on outdoor construction projects, where personnel skills and 
;avy equipment produce significant infrastructure repair and improvements to roads, sidewalks, public 
cilities and storm water structures. A work order system was implemented in 2009 to prioritize, schedule and 
ack tasks and was further used in 201 as we strive towards inputting data for all work done by Public Works 
f future project planning. 

ORESTRY DIVISION 

le focus of the Forestry Division in 2010 was on the maintenance of town trees along public ways particularly 
i scenic roads and in town cemeteries, parks and open space. The Forestry budget is reimbursed by the 
tilities Department for electric line clearing done for the Electric Light Division, 

QUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

loser inspection and additional preventive maintenance of vehicles extends the service life and reduces the 
aintenance costs of a public works fleet. In 2010 Public Works was able to improve the level of service 
ovided through this Division by providing a hydraulic lift and an indoor wash facility. Since then the 
echanic has been able to perform additional routine maintenance of the fleet including replacing starters, front 
;els, exhaust systems, brakes and increased efficacy in oil changes. The wash facility provides a place to rinse 
Tthe fleet to reduce the effects of corrosion and extend the life of vehicle bodies. 

RANSFER STATION 

le Transfer Station is operated by members of the Highway Division and accepts yard waste, specifically 
ass clippings, leaves, brush and small branches and is open Wednesdays and Saturdays from 8:00 AM until 
30 PM. White goods, electrical appliances, televisions and computer monitors are now disposed of curbside 
' the Town's trash contractor which can be accomplished by scheduling and paying S25 in advance to JRM at 
'8-536-2500. 

iblic Works' Special Collections are conducted twice yearly at the Transfer Station. We accept oil based 
.ints and related products, car batteries, fluorescent bulbs, tires and mercury (which are also accepted at the 
iblic Works Office at the Town Hall during regular business hours of operation). The fall collection is held in 
njunction with the Health Department's Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day to better serve residents, 
iblic Works is looking into excepting scrap metal at the Transfer Station in 201 1 . 

\NITATION 

ich pound of recyclable material that is diverted from the trash stream results in a reduction of our trash costs, 
ice the Town is charged a fixed fee for pickup of recyclables and a tipping fee for every pound of trash 
llected. The total tonnage of solid waste picked up in calendar year 2010 (3688.06 tons) decreased by 161.24 
is over that collected in 2009 (3849.3 tons), a decrease of 4% and a savings to the town of SI 0,64 1.84. The 
:al tonnage of recycling collected in calendar year 2010 (1386.76 tons) increased by 108.32 tons over that 
llected in 2009 (1278.44 tons), an increase of 8%. 



52 



SNOW & ICE OPERATIONS 

The winter of 2009-2010 was a challenge year at the beginning for both Town employees and contractors whc 
work to keep the roads, public sidewalks, schools and town parking lots safe and passable. The cost for snow 
and ice operations came in under budget and the left over money was put towards building a new shed at the 
DPW Facility for the storage of snow plows in the offseason. Access for emergency response vehicles remai 
to be the top priority for Town crews during Snow and Ice Operations. Snow removal from sidewalks in clos< 
proximity to schools is also a high priority after roadways are cleared, for students walking to school. 

******** 




FACILITIES MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 

William A. Hodge, Sr. - Facilities Director 

Jane H. Spellman - Assistant to the Facilities Director 

This report contains the accomplished tasks of the Facilities Management Department during the calendar ye* 
2010. Daily operations during this period included the response to and completion of 1 184 work orders with i 
average productivity rate of 94% from the Facilities staff in addition to 12 major projects. 



b 



The projected Facilities' mission for 2010 was to improve the overall appearance, safety, working and living 
conditions of the buildings within the Municipal Complex. Additionally, to upgrade the preventive 
maintenance to the buildings and equipment of the Town's facilities for safety and economic improvements 
continuing service contracts from outside vendors and improving the job knowledge of the in-house staff. 
To this end, seven service contracts are in place for Fire Alarm, Fire Sprinkler, HVAC, Plumbing, Masonry, 
Elevator, Generator, and Electrical Services. 
The major projects were completed with the additional funds allocated for this purpose and were accomplishe' 
by outside contractors, in-house staff, and over 2,140 hours of labor requested of and provided by the County 
Correctional Facility. 



53 




e following are the major projects completed during this year; 

Police Station - Removal of the old slate roof, replacing it with fake slate vinyl asphalt roof. 

Police Station - Renovate the employee exercise room and replace the single pane windows with energy 

efficient thermal pane units. Install a suspended ceiling and retro fit the lighting to conserve energy, and 

paint. 

Police Station - Renovate the Squad Room to accommodate an office for a much needed interview 

room. Renovate the plumbing system in the cell blocks. 

Purchase and install a Portable Generator that will power up the entire Town Hall in the event of an 

emergency. 

Install 160 Solar Panels on the roof of Town Hall to conserve energy. 

Remove the old analog phone system and install a voice over IP system. 

Replace the flood damaged boiler in the Visitor Center and install a new more energy efficient boiler in 

a new location to prevent future damage if basement becomes flooded again. 

Initiate a carpet replace program in the Public Library starting with the old carpet in the Children's 

Room. 

Completed the window replacement program in Town Hall so that all windows in office areas now have 

insulated energy saving windows. 

Waterproofed the elevator shaft in Town Hall and repacked the main elevator lift plunger that was 

damaged by flood water. 

Removed damaged granite steps (safety hazard) in front of Town Hall. 

Clean, scraped and painted the Green St Bridge rails. 



54 




In the coming year, the Facilities Department plans to continue to address the multiple problems within the 
Town physical plant with a focus on energy, safety, and esthetics of the Cemetery Building, Animal Shelter 
the Public Library; plus address more improvements on the other buildings as funding allows. 

Other projects if funding allows are the replacement of the columns in front of Town Hall as the existing 
columns are becoming dry rotted and presenting safety issues. Address some safety issues in the Central Fire 
Station by tuck pointing the exterior brick work and epoxy coating the main engine bay floors to prevent 
spalling and deterioration due to road chemicals and salt. Renovation of the little school house at the entrance 
Cemetery. This would make a more pleasing and attractive setting for visitors and families doing business w 
the Cemetery Superintendent. Complete the window replacement program at the Police Station and retrofit tl 
remaining lighting to reduce energy consumption. 





******** 



CEMETERY & PARKS DEPARTMENT 

Jeffrey M. Putur, Superintendent 

The Cemetery and Parks Department primary focus is the completion of all interments year-round in all of the 
cemeteries in Ipswich. The Department is responsible for the care and maintenance of nine cemeteries and 
seven parks, plus all town commons, the Ipswich resident side of Crane Beach, the Boardwalk, and Pavilion 
Beach. In addition, we maintain all town-owned Open Space areas, such as Strawberry Hill, Dow Brook 

55 



onservation, Shady Creek, Nichols Field, and Great Neck Conservation area. During the winter season as 
eather permits, Bakers Pond is plowed off to accommodate skaters. 

e assist civic groups in the many activities that take place throughout the year as well as supply assistance to 
!e Public Works Department in snow removal, sanding operations, and any other emergency situations as 
eded. We also provide aid to the Town Clerk in setting up voting equipment, tables, and chairs for all 
actions. In 2010, the staff completed 1 1 1 interments; completed the restoration and revitalization of Southside 
jmetery, improved on the drainage system at Bialek Park playground, and completed all major renovations of 
I' baseball field. 

e also broke ground at Clark Road with the installation of locally harvested Locust posts that were de-barked 
ior to their installation. The posts were then modified so they could be properly installed with the support 
ams that will be the main support for the Observation deck. 

Cemetery and Parks Revenue 2010 

ifapel Tent $2025 

iiundations $9788.75 

>enings $46000 

rpetual Care $6950 

le of Lots $6900 

tal $71663.75 

******** 

i:partment of code enforcement 

ines A. Sperber, Director 

JANUARY 1, 2010 TO DECEMBER 31, 2010 



Category / Construction 


#of 
Permits 


Total Fees 


Value of Work 


Additions 


23 


$16,282.40 


$1,762,650.00 


Attached Accessory 


1 


$45.00 


$2,500.00 


Certificate of Occupancy 


52 


$1,410.00 


$0.00 


Commercial - New 


1 


$4,950.00 


$550,000.00 


Commercial - Alter. 


32 


$19,202.00 


$2,161,795.00 


Decks & Porches 


28 


$2,711.70 


$247,345.00 


Demo & Reconstruct 


7 


$77,172.00 


$8,547,850.00 


Demolition 


11 


$949.50 


$80,450.00 


Detached Accessory 


33 


$13,770.00 


$1,400,140.00 


Fence 


11 


$705.00 


$39,100.00 


Foundation Only 


8 


$1,191.60 


$133,400.00 


Multi-Family Dwelling 


3 


$28,110.00 


$3,090,000.00 


Miscellaneous 


39 


$5,200.20 


$765,356.80 


Remodel/Alteration 


134 


$27,064.10 


$2,797,556.51 


Repair 


90 


$10,289.70 


$961,342.00 


Roofs, Siding, Windows 


293 


$28,607.59 


$2,594,537.28 


Single Family Attached 


9 


$24,780.00 


$2,720,000.00 


Single Family Dwelling 


6 


$26,460.00 


$2,920,000.00 


Sign 


18 


$855.00 


$23,200.00 



56 



Solid Fuel Burning Appl 


iances 




22 


$1,470.00 


$50,400.00 


Swimming Pools 






7 


$1,990.20 


$192,900.00 


Tents 






73 


$2,970.00 


$137,795.00 




Totals 




901 


$296,185.99 


$31,178,317.59 


Plumbing 


Total Fees 


Gas 


Total Fees 


247 


S21 


110.00 


245 


$11,670.00 


Electric Permits 




Total Fees 








477 






$51,265.00 







The above is based on permit activity for the calendar year. The fiscal year commences July 1 st and ends June 
30 l . Building permits are required for not only new construction, but also for repairs and replacement of 
existing structures, decks, sheds, signs, wood and pellet stoves & fences over six feet high. If you have any 
question about whether your project may require a building permit, please call our office at 978-356-6605. 



******** 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Colleen E. Fermon, Health Agent 

Board of Health Members: Chairperson, Susan Hubbard, Spencer Amesbury and Charles Hill. 

The following data is the yearly report for 2010. 



Licenses and Permits Issued 




Health Inspections and Investigations 


Food Service 


62 


Food Establishment Inspections 


Retail Food 


32 


Nuisance, Health and Environmental 
Complaints 


Caterer 


8 


Housing Inspections 


Temporary Food 


35 


Lead Determinations 


Mobile Food 


8 


Title 5 Inspection Reports 


Frozen Desserts 


2 


Deep Hole Observations 


Biological Haulers 


1 


Percolation Tests 


Septic Haulers 


27 


Septic System Inspections 


Septic Installers 


57 


Swimming Pool Inspections 


Septic System Inspectors 


28 


Bathing Water Tests 


Swimming Pools 


10 


Recreational Camps for Children 


Recreational Camps 


3 


Motels, Inns and B&Bs 


Motels 


2 




Bottling 


1 


Plan Review 


Tobacco 


14 


Septic Plan Review 


Funeral Directors 


2 


Septic As Built Review 


Disposal System Construction 


61 


Food Plan Review 


Well Permits 


4 


HACCP Plan Review 


Beaches 


6 


Well Plan Review 


Trench permits 


62 


Building Plan Review 


Sealer of Weights & Measures 






Liquid Measuring Meters 


67 




Scales & Balances 


93 





252 
32 

21 



68 

116 

58 

114 

27 

63 

4 

1 



92 

37 

5 

1 

3 

174 



57 



Disease Surveillance 




Immunizations 


Campylobacteriosis 


4 


Seasonal Influenza 


Pertussis 


1 


H1N1 


Salmonellosis 


1 




Latent TB Infection 


1 


Health Fairs 


Cryptosporidiosis 


2 


Wellness Clinics 


Hepatitus C 


15 




Lyme 


31 




Giardiasis 


3 




Babesiosis 


1 




Streptococccus Pneumoniae 


2 




Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis 


5 





293 
442 

1 
32 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Robert A. Grambale, Chairman 

The Zoning Board of Appeals serves two functions. First, they are empowered to issue special 
permits and variances. Second, they are the local authority where someone who feels aggrieved 
may appeal an enforcement order issued by the Zoning Enforcement Officer specifically when the 
order alleges a violation of the Ipswich Zoning Regulations. The Board can also overturn a ruling 
or decision of the Zoning Enforcement Officer. Orders issued under the Massachusetts Building 
Code (780 CMR) may be appealed to a different board (State Building Code Appeals Board). 
Land use and zoning regulations fall under Chapter 40A of Massachusetts General Laws. The 
Ipswich Zoning Board of Appeals meets the third Thursday of each month except during 
December. All applications must be filed in the Town Clerk Office by 4:00 PM. Meetings are 
posted in Town Hall at least 48 hours prior to meeting. 

Special permits can be granted if the proposed work or use does not have a detrimental effect on 
the surrounding neighborhood. Some of the general categories of consideration are any increase 
of traffic, parking, noise, dust odors etc. Ipswich Zoning Bylaw [IBL], section V-D would only 
be allowed if the Board chooses to grant a special permit. Special permits may also authorize an 
expansion of a previously existing, non-conforming use or structure as outlined in [IBL], II-B & 
XI-J. Existing non-conforming structures and uses are most commonly referred to as 
Grandfathered. 

The Zoning Board may also issue a variance. This would allow a use that is ordinarily prohibited 
or a structure to be constructed, expanded or altered where the bylaw would otherwise prohibit 
such expansion or alteration. Variances should only be granted where a hardship exists and only 
when the hardship is directly related to the land. Some examples are soil characteristics, shape or 
topography. If someone feels there is a financial hardship, it must also be related to the land in 
some manner. The Zoning Board usually makes their decision the night of the hearing. There is 
nothing that prevents the Board from continuing the hearing and voting at a later time. Once the 
decision is made by vote of the Board, the written decision is filed in the Town Clerks' Office. 
There is then a twenty (20) day appeal period after the decision is filed. If no one appeals the 
decision (in court) it must be filed with the property deed at the Salem Registry of Deeds. It does 
not become a legal instrument until it is filed and must be filed within one (1) year. No building 



58 



permit or use/occupancy certificate can be issued (if required) until the special permit or variance 
is recorded at the registry. 

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 

Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

The Department of Planning & Development is responsible for guiding the development and 
conservation of land in the Town of Ipswich, both through the regulatory process and through the 
development and implementation of long-range plans. It does this in part by providing support 
and guidance for each of the boards and commissions within its directorate: the Planning Board, 
the Conservation Commission, the Historical Commission, and the Affordable Housing 
Partnership. Reports on their activities are given below. The Department also provides support to 
the Open Space Committee, the Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board, the Design Review Board, 
the Agricultural Commission, and various ad hoc committees. Listed below are some of the 
initiatives undertaken by the Department in 2010; 

• Drafted two zoning articles for fall town meeting; both of which were adopted; for more 
on these articles, see Planning Board report below. 

• Established ad hoc study committee and worked with them to further development of the 
proposed Architectural Preservation District, including presentations to the Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board, and the Ipswich Museum. 

• In conjunction with the engineering firm VHB, Inc., managed the development of the 25% 
design plan for the North Green Streetscape Improvement Project. 

Under the direction of the Open Space Program Manager, undertook numerous open space 
initiatives, including: 

(1 ) completed conservation of Maplecroft Farm, a 247-acre property which was one of the highest 
priorities on the Open Space Bond list due to its multiple resource values, agricultural values, 
wetlands, and scenic views. The Town's expenditure of $2,070,000 in Open Space Bond funds 
leveraged an additional $3.03 million to acquire conservation and agricultural preservation rights' 
for $5.1 million. Additionally, the landowners conveyed a trail easement to the Essex County 
Trails Association, providing the public with passive recreational access to the property; (2) along 
with a subcommittee of the Open Space Committee and Agriculture Commission and consultants 
Walter Cudnohufsky Associates, completed an "Analysis of Ipswich Agriculture and Agricultural 
Land" and established a BOS-appointed committee to implement the study's recommendations; 
(3) worked with the Open Space Committee and the Athletic Fields Study Committee to explore 
options for continuing the Town's Open Space Program after the original $10 million bond 
authorization is spent, concluding with the recommendation that the Town consider a 
reauthorization of the Open Space Bond which would include funds for acquisition of open space 
as well as development of athletic fields. 

Under the direction of the Open Space Stewardship Coordinator, undertook a variety of 
stewardship efforts, including the following: completed baseline monitoring at two of the Town's 
largest Conservation Restrictions on Ipswich Country Club and Maplecroft Farm; began 

59 



construction of the Clark Pond overlook at the Great Neck Conservation Area working with the 
Town Parks and Cemeteries staff; collaborated with students from the Ipswich High School 
Environmental Club and Corliss Bros. Nursery on a tree planting initiative at Strawberry Hill; 
developed maps and regulations for Town-owned properties with public access trails and 
coordinated posting on Police, Utilities and Town websites; represented Town on Clark Pond 
Management Committee established to develop Management Plan for Clark Pond; coordinated 
with Mass Audubon to continue ongoing efforts to pull invasive pepperweed plants with 
volunteers on Town properties; worked with Conservation Commission to address issues of 
encroachment and trail access on Town land at Hood Farms; and worked with graphic designer to 
create artwork for educational signage to be installed at the Dow Brook Conservation Area. 

• Working with the Historical Commission, Planning staff used GIS to map First Period 
homes and assisted in the design and creation of the First Period Homes of Ipswich, 
Massachusetts walking guide and map. 

• At the behest of the Waterways Committee and the Harbormaster, Planning staff used GIS 
to create a set of mooring field maps for use by the Harbormaster. 

The Department was fortunate in 2010 to have the services of Tufts graduate students Melissa 
Shakro and Libby Mahaffey. As our summer intern, Melissa provided valuable assistance on 
various planning initiatives (including the zoning amendments, and the annual Commonwealth 
Capital application), and during the school year Libby played a major role in the Architectural 
Preservation District initiative. 

PLANNING BOARD 

Tim Purinton, Co-Chair 
Brian Hone, Co-Chair 

A mix of residential projects and commercial developments constituted the Planning Board's 
regulatory activity in 2010. Noteworthy projects included the completion of an extensive review 
of the 51 -unit residential development redesign for Turner Hill begun the previous year, the 
consideration of a five unit condominium development in the downtown, and the review of a 
project to add a second-story to an existing manufacturing facility off Town Farm Road. The 
diversity of projects afforded the Board a variety of opportunities to encourage and promote 
appropriate and context sensitive development. Early in the year, the Board gained Kathleen 
Milano as an associate member while Suzanne Benfield stepped up from her associate status to 
become a voting member upon the departure in January of Jim Manzi. Brian Hone replaced 
Manzi as co-chair. 

Planning Matters 

The Board's primary long-term planning initiative for 2010 was sponsoring two articles for the 
Fall Town Meeting, both of which were adopted. One expanded what had been a footnote in the 
zoning bylaw to provide more guidance for developing accessory buildings into residential units 
by addressing affordability, historic aspects, modifications and size. The adoption of the article 
continued the Planning Board's efforts, consistent with the 2003 Community Development Plan, 
to provide a range of housing opportunities for residents of all income levels and abilities. The 



60 



second article addressed miscellaneous ambiguities, omissions or inadequacies of the bylaw, an 
annual housekeeping item in the zoning amendment process. 

The Planning Board in 2010 also worked with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) 
after the Town was awarded two planning grants. One involved identifying potential zoning 
mechanisms for the protection of scenic corridors both in Ipswich and in Essex. The other grant 
involved a number of communities on the north shore, and focused on identifying areas of land to 
be protected and areas of land suitable for development in each municipality. 

Regulatory Matters 

The Planning Board took the following regulatory actions in 2010; 

• Modified the Great Estate Preservation Development special permit for Turner Hill to 
allow for the development of 51 townhouse residential units. 

• Issued a special permit for a residential unit in an existing accessory building at 28 Old 
England Road and began public hearings for another on East Street. 

• Modified a site plan review to allow the addition of a second story to an existing 
manufacturing facility at 31 Locust Road. 

• Issued a special permit for a five-unit condominium development at 6-8 North Main 
Street. 

• Issued a special permit to allow the rental of U-Haul trucks from Tick's Auto Repair at 
1 1 3 Central Street. 

• Issued two special permits for wells located within the Water Supply Protection District at 
Mile Lane athletic fields and 210 High Street. 

• Approved a site plan review for a barn addition and riding arena relocation at 6 Mill Road. 

• Issued a special permit to allow one apartment to be divided into two apartments at 80 
Central Street. One of the apartments will be made permanently affordable. 

• Modified a special permit to allow repairs to be made to low impact development (LID) 
improvements at Partridgeberry Place. 

• Modified the Great Estate Preservation Development special permit relative to tree 
removal, creation of an indoor driving range within the golf maintenance building and 
paving the fire road at Turner Hill. 

• Issued two Scenic Road permits to allow for the removal of two trees causing problems 
within the public right of way and the removal of a portion of a stone wall located within 
the public right of way for a driveway at 17 Mile Lane and 363 Linebrook Road, 
respectively. 

• Issued two Scenic Road permits to allow the Department of Public Works to remove trees 
within the public right of way posing a hazard to the Utilities Department's poles and 
wires. 

The Board also reviewed and endorsed fifteen applications for ANR (Approval Not Required 
under Subdivision Control Law) plans, held eight subcommittee meetings to review projects in 
detail with applicants and their engineers, and conducted numerous site visits. 



61 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

David Standley, Chair 
Jennifer Hughes, Vice Chair 
David Pancoast, Conservation Agent 
Gail R. Surpitski, Recording Secretary 

The Conservation Commission is comprised of seven appointed residents who serve as unpaid 
volunteers. They are: David Standley (Chair), Jennifer Hughes (Vice-Chair), Sissy ffolliott, Brian 
O'Neill, Karl Kastorf and William McDavitt, who replaced Barbara Beaman in 2010; and 
Associate Commissioner Catherine Carney-Feldman, also appointed in 201 t Sharon Cushing 
stepped down in late 2010 due to her move out of state. The Commission thanks Sharon for her 
significant contributions during her many years of service. 

The Commission is engaged in a variety of activities on behalf of the Town beyond its regulatory 
duties, including land conservation and preservation. Most of its time, however, is occupied with 
its formal role as the local environmental regulatory board under the Massachusetts Wetlands 
Protection Act and the Ipswich Wetlands Protection Bylaw, both of which focus on water 
resource/impact regulation. 

In early 2010 the Commission conducted extensive review of its own bylaw regulations, with the 
goal of integrating them and making them consistent with the recently enacted Ipswich Storm 
Water Bylaw (Ipswich General Bylaws Art. XIX) and its regulations. During that process the 
Commission found it necessary to modify the bylaw language through action of the fall town 
meeting. The town meeting approval gave the Commission the legal authority to apply the Storm 
Water Bylaw to non-jurisdictional portions of properties for which wetlands permits are sought, 
as intended by the new bylaw to avoid duplicative permitting. The Commission also began the 
important process of augmenting and clarifying its various functions with official programs and 
with website and process improvements, which are ongoing into 201 1 . 

In 2010, the Commission continued regulatory oversight of several ongoing projects, including 
the Turner Hill Great Estates Preservation Development and Riverpoint (f/k/a Ipswich Pines) 40B 
housing development on Topsfield Road. 2010 also saw the commencement of another large Ch. 
40B project on County Road, Powderhouse Village, which is a residential and commercial 
development containing two large buildings, one of which directly abuts Saltonstall Brook. The 
project has components both onsite and at the adjacent YMCA/VFW site. In addition, the 
Commission addressed myriad official filings, requests, emergencies, violations and citizen's 
queries, as shown in the table below, and numerous unofficial requests, submissions, and inquiries 
that are not tabulated. The list compares the 2010 permitting activities with the previous five 
calendar years, to indicate trends and changes in the various tabulated categories, and shows the 
running average number of permitting activities over the most recent six years, including the last 
one. 



62 



. 



Activity 


2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


2010 


Avg. 


Orders of Conditions/ 
Amendments 


56 


31 


32 


37 


35 


41 


39 


Orders Resource Area 
Delineation 


4 


1 


1 


1 





1 


1 


Determinations of 
Applicability 


31 


22 


29 


34 


29 


23 


28 


Certificates of 
Compliance 


21 


28 


27 


11 


16 


16 


20 


Extension Permits 


6 


10 


5 


8 


9 


3 


7 


Enforcement Actions 


13 


11 


15 


19 


8 


6 


12 


Other* 


49 


37 


26 


30 


14 


11 


28 


Totals 


180 


140 


135 


140 


111 


101 


135 



* "Other" includes various official filings not tabulated in categories, such as emergency 
certifications and minor modifications, as well as scheduled Citizens' Queries. 

To accomplish the permitting process, Commission members attended 22 regularly scheduled 
evening meetings, visited numerous projects and fielded citizens' queries. Staff continues to 
inspect all proposed project sites before hearings and during project activities, as well as inspect 
certain building permit project sites, to ascertain any needs for jurisdictional filings. 

The Commission's 2010 efforts in land acquisition and management of open space continued in 
concert with the Open Space Committee, the Board of Selectmen, the Open Space Bond Program 
Manager, and the Open Space Stewardship Coordinator. A primary focus was on the acquisition 
of significant Agricultural Preservation and Conservation Restrictions over most of Maplecroft 
Farm, located between Argilla, Heartbreak, Essex, and Northgate Roads. 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
June Gahan, Chair 
Judy Field, Chair 

The Ipswich Historical Commission meets monthly to assist property owners and various Town 
properties in identifying, evaluating, preserving and protecting historic assets in Ipswich. The 
Commission reviewed, conducted some site visits, and took action on several projects in 2010, 
including; 

• Trustees of Reservations - Appleton Home; off Argilla Road 

• Turner Hill on Topsfield Road 

• 6-8 Main Street 

The Commission in 2010 also continued its recent efforts to update each of the 35 covenants held 
on historic properties throughout Ipswich. To date, with the assistance of photographer Johanne 
Cassia, the Commission has catalogued photographs of nine buildings and their architectural 
features, and met with the owners of each property. Other activities of the Historic Commission 
in 2010 included; 



63 



• Updated approximately seven Form Bs on historic Ipswich homes; 

• Donated the book "Something to Preserve" to the Library on Congress to be added to their 
collection. 

• Gave the Mary Conley Award to historic preservation consultant Sue Nelson for her 
preservation efforts relative to a number of properties in town, including the home at 8 
Water Street. 

The Historical Commission underwent some changes in 2010. Three new members, Al Boynton, 
Bryan Townsend, and Judy Field, saw their first full year of service in 2010. -And in the fall of 
2010, Judy Field was selected as the new chair, replacing June Gahan. 

AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST FUND BOARD 

Susan Monahan, Chair 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Michael Schaaf, Chair 

The mission of the Ipswich Housing Partnership is to promote and assist with the expansion and 
preservation of affordable housing in Ipswich in a manner consistent with the community's 
objectives and character. The Partnership works closely with the Affordable Housing Trust Fund 
Board, which was established in 2005 to oversee and expend funds paid to the Town for 
affordable housing purposes by developers as a result of zoning requirements. By its Articles of 
Incorporation, two of the Trust Fund Board members must be members of the Partnership, and the 
two groups often meet jointly. Initiatives undertaken and/or completed by the Trust Fund Board 
and the Partnership and Trust Fund Board in 2010 included: 

• For $40,000, the Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board acquired a deed restriction create a 
permanently affordable one bedroom unit newly-constructed at 21-23 South Main Street. 
This condominium was marketed under an Affirmative Fair Market Plan for a price of 
$135,655, and a low/moderate income buyer purchased the unit in May. 

• The Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board awarded two 510,000 down payment 
assistance forgivable loans to income-eligible, first-time homebuyers, to facilitate the 
purchase of homes at 66 RiverPoint, Unit 20, and 31 Brownville Avenue. 

The Trust Fund took in approximately $21,000 in 2010, most of which came from two separate 
housing projects. Investment income came from the North Shore Home Consortium. Expenses 
for the year were $20,000 for first time home buyer assistance, and $12,036 for staff and 
administration. The year-end balance of the Trust was $334,663. An additional $135,500 is 
committed to the fund, a substantial portion of which is expected to be received within the next 
two years. 

The Housing Partnership advocated for several affordable housing initiatives, including working 
with the Ipswich Housing Authority to maximize the use of its resources. Both the staff and the 
membership of the Partnership and Trust Fund saw some changes in 2010. Selectman Pat 
McNally joined the Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board in June, replacing outgoing Selectman 

64 



Ingrid Miles. When William "Jay" Gallagher stepped down after eight years of service, Ingrid 
filled his position on the Partnership. Former member Don Greenough rejoined the Partnership in 
2010, after a three year hiatus. In June the Partnership and the Trust Fund Board bid farewell to 
Affordable Housing Coordinator Thomas Bentley, who left to take a full-time position in the 
ministry. Tom, who will be missed, was replaced in October by Terry Anderson, who brings a 
wealth of housing experience to the table. Welcome aboard, Terry! 

IPSWICH OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Carolyn Britt and Wayne Castonguay, Co-Chairs 

In 2010, the Open Space Committee completed the multi-faceted Maplecroft Farm Project. After 
nearly two years of dedication, patience, and hard work by our Open Space Program Manager, 
Kristen Grubbs, and many others on town boards, the Trust for Public Land facilitated the 
purchase of agricultural and conservation restrictions on Maplecroft Farm, the largest open space 
project to date. The deal was completed in May of 2010. This was celebrated in a town-wide 
event on October 6 th at the farm. The Maplecroft Farm Conservation Project includes a 1.5-mile 
trail easement held by Essex County Trails Association and a three-year renewable lease on 
soccer fields held by the Ipswich Youth Soccer Association. 

Other on-going and completed projects include: 

• Negotiations for a conservation restriction and trail easement abutting the 22.5 acre 
Turkey Hill Conservation Area. 

• A continued search for additional land suitable for athletic fields. Maximum effort has 
been put into finding land for athletic fields, but such opportunities are just not available at 
this time. 

• Groundwork for implementation of the Ipswich Agricultural Study, with a Select board 
appointed committee to begin meetings in 201 1. 

• Evaluation of the desirability of the Community Preservation Act (CPA) against the 
continuance of the highly successful Open Space Bond Program for land protection in the 
future. The state's matching funds for the CPA are presently at a relatively low level, so 
there is more support from the Board of Selectman and Finance Committee for a possible 
five-year extension of the current bond program. 

The committee also applied for and received a two-year extension of the Town's Open Space Plan 
from the Commonwealth allowing for some updating and additions to the current plan through 
2013. A new five-year plan will be in the works in the near future. As always, the committee 
welcomes anyone interested in coming to our monthly meetings. 

AGRICULTURAL COMMISSION 

Royce Knowlton, Warren Jepson, Co Chairs 



In 2010 we saw the final approval and implementation of the Right to Farm Bylaw. This can and 
should help both farmers and residents in averting or settling any disputes that may arise from 
farming activities. This law also requires that all Real Estate agents notify all prospective buyers 
that Ipswich has a Right to Farm Bylaw. We saw the completion of the protection plan for 



65 






Maplecroft Farm, this was mostly due to the hard work of the Open Space committee, but we also 
see it as a huge benefit to the residents of Ipswich and the farming community. 

Moving forward in 201 1 we will be working with the Open Space committee on implementing the 
recommendations of the Agricultural study, completed in 2009. One purpose of this is to try and 
match up owners of potential farm land with farmers in need of land, and to identify land that 
better suited for other uses. Farming is the most cost effective to keep open space open. This is 
true not only for the private landowner but for publicly owned land as well. 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Recreation Director 

The Recreation Department continued its mission to maintain a variety of programs, services, and 
activities to enhance the social, physical, and emotional well being of all our citizens. 
Community events included the July 4th parade & field day, a Halloween parade & program, and 
parades on Memorial Day and Veterans' Day organized by local veterans' groups. Programs 
featured an outdoor concert by the Merrimack Valley Concert Fire Band as well as one by the 
Ipswich Community Band, a UNH Caravan Show, a magic show for "Harry Potter's Birthday" 
celebration, a staff and student talent show, and the annual "Foam Frolic" at Bialek Park. 

Summer offerings included tennis lessons at the high school courts, golf lessons at Ipswich 
Country Club, "Workreation" job training and social events for young teens, Jr. Summer Fun 
weeks, and a Theatre Camp week. Open swim was again contracted at the YMCA for day camp 
enrollees. 

Winter programs included a ski program for grades 3-8, and February vacation week featured 
Mardi Gras Madness, Make It-Take Day, Snow Adventures and our annual "Harry Potter Day". 
After school programs included homework and computer projects, crafts, adventure and sports 
activities, cooking, crafts, and weekly off-site trips. April vacation days included Flowers, Farm, 
& Feasts, "Children's Museum Trip", "World of Wheels", and a Great Games "Olympiad". 
Children's golf classes were offered at the Rowley Country Club during spring and fall seasons. 
Friday Fun Nights continued for school aged children with crafts, gym games, and special events. 
Adult activities at Town Hall included basketball, soccer, ping pong, and user-funded sessions in 
bridge, Spanish, sewing, and knitting. Outdoor lights were used at Bialek Park for informal soccer 
and ultimate frisbee, an adult softball league, spring and summer girls softball, and youth football 
practices. 

Town Hall facilities including a program room, kitchen, cafeteria, lounge, crafts room, Teen 
Center, and gymnasium were scheduled by the Recreation Department for local sports, scouts, 
and social service agencies' meetings and programs for residents of all ages. The Program Room 
and part of the Recreation Office was renovated for use by ICAM cable operations. Gym space 
was shared by youth basketball teams, indoor soccer training, and cheerleading, Adult users 
included programs for ping pong, basketball, futsal, and obedience dog training. 

66 



Donations from local nurseries including Corliss Bros., Gordon's, Marini's and Wolf Hill, as well 
as a financial contribution from the First National Bank of Ipswich, provided funding and 
landscaping elements near the new playground at Bialek Park. Design work and labor was 
provided by resident Tanya Marshall who organized a crew of volunteers to install the plantings 
and water them regularly throughout the summer and early fall. 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation Director met regularly throughout the 
year to discuss programs, facilities, and policies as well as to plan for the future. Members 
continued to volunteer at a number of our regular programs. 

YOUTH SERVICES 

Marcia Ford, Youth Director 

Youth services in Ipswich are dedicated to improving the lives of Ipswich youth by offering a 
number of varied programs to meet recreational, academic, and social needs of this unique 
population. Our foundation continues to be community collaboration, and many programs were 
developed as joint ventures with other local agencies in direct response to community needs. 

Community service projects were organized for volunteer teens, church and Scouts groups, and those 
referred through the local courts and Juvenile Diversion programs. They were involved in cleaning 
and gardening projects at Town Hall and Bialek Park. Others provided help with our youth programs 
and some services for needy senior citizens. 

After school enrichment continued and homework sessions led by staff and supportive volunteers 
were incorporated into the daily programs. Inter-generational experiences with senior citizens 
helped to teach knitting and quilting to interested youngsters. Thursday early release days 
provided opportunities for field trips to various educational and recreational sites. 

_ 

Talk to a Friend, our peer leadership program for grades 6-8, met weekly to receive training on 
current youth issues and discuss relationships with peers and family members. Students helped 
chaperone activities for younger children while learning some mentoring and mediation skills. 
Members help with set up and cleaning duties for weekly drop-in nights and receive training in sales 
procedures to operate an on-site snack bar that offers reasonably priced items for attendees. A web 
site for teens promoted current offerings and surveyed suggestions for new programs and activities. 

Summer "Workreation" for students entering grade 7-9 and a complimentary "Bridge" group for 
grade 6 provided job training and work experiences in our offerings as well as help at the Birth to 
Three Center. Also led daily reading sessions with young day campers and weekly visits to the 
Library to get books and attend their special events. 

Family advocacy services were provided on an as-needed basis to families in need who met with the 
youth director to determine their current needs and secure connections to available services. Regular 
meetings provided further monitoring and coordination of related services. In addition, the director 
was available for after-hours support and crisis intervention for at-risk families. 



67 



Regular training sessions were provided for summer and school year staff members to maintain their 
skills in safety practices, basic first aid, student motivation, conflict resolution and group 
management. 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Diane Mitchell, Executive Director 

A wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich were provided under the umbrella of 
Council on Aging Services. A senior center operated weekdays, 8:00-4:00, at the Town Hall. 
Three part-time receptionists welcomed guests, answered the phone, and assisted with the daily 
operation of the center. 

Regular programs included a book discussion group, bridge and card groups, knitting and quilting 
groups, art classes, a monthly lunch club and a single friends group. Health-related programs 
included monthly health screenings, weekly blood pressure clinics, a monthly nutrition program, 
massage, hearing clinics, yoga, exercise, ballroom dancing, line dancing classes and a swimming 
group. The COA Travel Club attended two overseas trips sponsored by the Friends of the Ipswich 
Elderly and day trips to various locations were held throughout the year. 

Special offerings included an inter-generational program, various dining programs, an Elder Law 
Education program, a summer picnic, a North Shore Youth Symphony recital, computer clinics, 
speakers on a variety of health, financial and legal issues, social gatherings for special 
observances and classes for a wide range of interests. A monthly newsletter written by the 
Director reached over 2200 elder households through support of local advertisers and a grant for 
postage. A Caregivers Support Group helped those dealing with frail elders. The Director 
continued to coordinate the Senior Citizen Property Tax Work-Off Program. A seven-member 
TRIAD Council consisting of local law enforcement and seniors offered safety awareness 
programs geared towards elders within our community. 

A new, handicapped accessible, 14-passenger van provided local transportation to Ipswich 
seniors. This van was funded entirely by a private donation and a small grant. Ipswich senior 
citizens were provided 4,336 one-way rides on the COA van, logging approximately 13,988 miles 
of service. The Friends group continued to raise funds and support projects that fell outside of the 
COA budget. The Friends also contributed to a Christmas party for 190 seniors held in the 
gymnasium of the town hall. Grants from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs and the Coburn 
Charitable Society provided a part-time administrative assistant, a part-time activities coordinator, 
and a volunteer recognition luncheon. 

The Outreach program enlisted a corps of 30 volunteers who provided 1999 hours of volunteer 
service to local elders. This program also provided volunteers who drove senior citizens 17, 500 
miles to out-of-town medical appointments. Other services of the Outreach program included 
social visits, friendly phone calls, help with chores, and guidance in making personal, medical, 
housing and financial decisions. Other assistance programs included Money Management and 
Bill Paying for elders and free income tax preparation provided by trained AARP volunteers. A 
7-member council'met monthly to review programs and operations and plan additional offerings. 

68 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 
EASTERN ESSEX DISTRICT 

Terrance P. Hart, District Director 

This department is charged under Chapter 1 15 Massachusetts General Laws with providing 
services to veterans, their survivors and dependents. Principal workload under state law includes 
the administration of aid to veterans and dependents. Communities fund this program, which is 
subsequently 75% reimbursed the following fiscal year by the Commonwealth. This is a need 
based program and the department is required to conduct periodic comprehensive review of the 
cases to insure no substantive facts have changed, while working with the veteran to identify 
alternative or long-term solutions to individual circumstances. During the calendar year 26 
Ipswich veterans/widows were on this program for varying periods. The Commonwealth made 
dramatic administrative changes to the program in 2010 requiring all submissions and 
authorizations to be paperless and submitted via the Health and Human Services computer and 
supporting documents also electronically transmitted. Under state law the department also assists 
qualified veterans to obtain bonuses, and qualified veterans, widows and parents to obtain state 
annuities, property tax abatements, and other benefits. 

The Veterans' Services program also mandates extensive interaction within the federal 
community, principally with the Department of Veterans' Affairs. The Veterans' Service Officer 
(VSO) assists veterans and their dependents in filing for pensions, service connected injury/illness 
compensation, dependency indemnity compensation for survivors, VA healthcare enrollment, 
insurance claims, decedent claims, and many other issues. Federal benefits processed by this 
department are paid directly to those eligible to receive the assistance or entitlement. The VA sent 
approximately $1.69 million to eligible recipients in Ipswich, of which the current staff is 
responsible for approximately $750,000 dollars paid to or saved by those assisted in Ipswich. 
Additionally, the department interacts within the federal community to correct military records, 
obtain needed documentation and insure veterans/dependents receive awards and recognition to 
which entitled. The VSO provided information, advice or assistance to 107 of the town's 1111 
identified veterans and 20 of the 299 identified veterans' widows during 2010. We also provide 
support and information assistance for National Guard and Reserves called up for service in Iraq 
or Afghanistan and their families. 

The Director and the Assistant to the Director, Georgia Gadbois, advocate for veterans on issues 
at the local, state and federal level, interact with elected and appointed officials on issues, and 
work with local organizations in serving the community. During the winter of 2010 the District 
also provided veterans' services assistance to the City of Gloucester as requested/authorized by 
the Board of Directors and the Massachusetts Department of Veterans' Services. 
The Eastern Essex District is composed of the Towns of Essex, Georgetown, Hamilton, Ipswich, 
Rowley, Wenham and West Newbury. A Board of Directors consisting of one selectman (or 
designee) from each town maintains oversight. Mr. Ray Morley is the Ipswich member of the 
Board of Directors. 



69 



UTILITIES DEPARTMENT 
Tim Henry, Director 

ELECTRIC DIVISION 

Jerry Cavanaugh Operations Manager 

The Power Plant continues in the ISO's (Independent System Operator) Forward Capacity Market 
with 9.2 MW's of the power plant's generation assets. Under this program the department is paid 
for being available for dispatch within 30 minutes of notification, Monday thru Friday. The 
operation of the plant in this market is being overseen by Jeff Turner as the Assistant Power Plant 
Superintendent. 

Kwh sales 

2008 sales 108,020,523 

2009 sales 106,296,811 

2010 sales 110,748,080 

The $7.5 million dollar distribution upgrade which included a new substation on Vermette Court 
was completed on time and under budget (final cost was S6 million). This will improve the system 
reliability as well as improved distribution system infrastructure. The department also completed 
the conductor project on Argilla Road which will decrease the number of tree and storm related 
outages on that Road. 

The Ipswich Wind project was delayed in 2010 due to the bankruptcy of the original turbine 
manufacturer (AAER Inc.). The department rebid the project and awarded the bid to GE and 
anticipates completion of the project in the first half of 201 1. 

In 2010, 16 new solar projects were connected to our system generating almost 15,000 kw's of 
electricity. These projects included a new system on the roof of the Town Hall which was funded 
by a State grant of $150,000 and $100,000 from the Electric Department conservation program. 

WATER & WASTEWATER DIVISIONS 
Vicki Halmen, Manager 

WATER DIVISION 

Total water pumping has remained at historic lows. The department actively promotes water 
conservation measures and continued the seasonal rate structure, which was started in 2003 to 
curb excessive summer water use. Free residential water audits were offered to customers in 
2010. Customers taking advantage of this offer were also given the opportunity to participate in a 
toilet rebate program, if eligible. Numerous customers participated and purchased low flow 
toilets as part of this program. 

The Water Department also became a partner in EPA's WaterSense Program which "seeks to 
protect the nation's water supply by promoting water efficiency and enhancing the market for 



70 



water-efficient products, programs, and practices." Please go to wvvw.epa.gov/VVaterSense for 
more details. 

Water main replacement projects were designed for Washington and North Main Streets in 2010 
and are slated for construction in 201 1 . The mains on each street are over 1 1 5 years old. The 
Department is committed to improving our aging infrastructure and will continue developing 
projects to increase the reliability of the water system. 

Ipswich Water System Data 2010 

New Extensions to Distribution System 

New Domestic Services 35 

Hydrants Installed 

Hydrants Repaired/Replaced 1 2 

New Water Mains Installed 

Total Length of Mains 496,405 ft. 

Metered Water Services 4676 

Unmetered Water Service 1 09 Fire Lines 

Water Usage in Millions of Gallons 

Dow Brook and Bull Brook Reservoirs 179 

Brown's Well 77 

Essex Road Well 33 

Fellows Road Well 45 

Mile Lane Well 32 

Winthrop Well 1 1 

Total Water Usage (MG) 377 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 
Joseph Ciccotelli, Superintendent 

2010 was a busy year with several projects completed. Following an extensive evaluation and 
approval process, the WTP changed the primary pH / corrosion control additive from potassium 
hydroxide to sodium hydroxide in October 2010, due to a 300% increase in product cost over the 
last four years. 

Construction of the Dow Reservoir Improvements Project officially started in November 2010, 
and will be performed in several stages to minimize disruption to the WTP's operation. This 
major infrastructure project includes operational and structural upgrades to the raw (untreated) 
water system and is scheduled to be completed by the end of May 201 1 . 

The original WTP Sedimentation Basin wood and metal residuals collection system was replaced 
with a new plastic and fiberglass system, improving performance and extending component life. 
In addition, a new chemical delivery system was installed to transport treatment chemicals from 
the WTP chemical storage area into the subterranean Mixing Basins. 

Electrical system upgrades were made at the Raw Water Pump Station, including the installation 
of two new VFD's (variable frequency drives), used to control the pumps operation and desired 

71 



flow output. Browns Well's entire electrical system was upgraded, including a new PLC 
(programmable logic controller) and a new surge-control valve, to minimize distribution system 
"water hammers". A VFD was added to Fellows Road Well to improve the wells performance 
and capacity, and additional electrical upgrades, including a new PLC, were also added. In 
addition to normal wear-and-tear related maintenance upgrades, all well sources are being 
modified / upgraded as part of the new EPA and DEP Groundwater Rule and Chemical Safety 
Strategy regulations. 

Finally, a propane Standby Generator was installed at the Mile Lane Booster Station to provide 
emergency water service during any power outages. This water is supplied to the Linebrook Road 
areas, including outer Linebrook Road and the Ipswich Country Club. 

WASTEWATER DIVISION 
Patrick J Brennan, Superintendent 

Construction of Phase 1 of the Solids Handling Project designed by Tighe & Bond Consulting 
Engineers began in 2010. The project was awarded to North Atlantic Coastal Constructors of 
Rowley and includes the installation of a centrifuge and refurbishment of the existing belt filter 
press to improve solids processing at the treatment plant. 

A 2009 Infiltration & Inflow (I&I) Study conducted on the wastewater collection system 
identified several sources of I&I which were repaired in 2010. Repairs included grouting several 
service laterals where breaks and/or infiltration were observed and the use of Cured-in-Place-Pipe 
(CIPP) technology to repair holes and broken pipe in various locations of the collection system in 
pipes ranging from 8 to 24-inches in diameter. 

Significant Waste Water Data from 2010: 

• 371 Million Gallons of wastewater was treated at our Facility. 

• 7. 1 Million Gallons of Septage was received and treated. 

• 55.9 inches of rain was recorded. 

• 2,780 cubic yards of Biosolids, removed from the wastewater stream, was dewatered and 
transported to the Agresource Compost Facility for beneficial reuse. 






FINANCE DIRECTORATE 
Rita M Negri, Finance Director 

ACCOUNTING OFFICE 

Rita M Negri, Town Accountant 

The Finance Director is the chief financial advisor to the Town Manager. She is responsible for 
the debt service, insurance, benefits, and other miscellaneous budgets. She submits revenue 
projections for budget purposes; meets with the Town Manager and department heads to review 
expenditure budgets; determines base budgets for the next budget cycle. She provides advice to 



72 



the selectmen, finance committee, and school committee of any significant changes in the town's 
financial condition and changes in legislation affecting municipal finance. 

The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full-time staff, a full-time Town Accountant who 
also serves as Finance Director, and an Assistant Town Accountant. The Accounting Department 
is responsible for processing the payroll for all employees, processing invoices for vendor 
payments, and preparing all W-2's and 1099's at year-end in accordance with IRS regulations. 

The Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the accounting records for the Town's revenues 
and expenditures; ensures that reconciliations are performed between applicable Town 
departments; assists in providing information on benefits available to employees; and oversees the 
operation of the Town's financial computer system. 

The Town Accountant also coordinates the annual independent audit of the Town's financial 
statements that was last completed by November 16, 2010, for the year ended June 30, 2010. The 
financial results for fiscal year 2010 were good. This was due to good collections on receivables, 
and responsible spending of appropriations. 

Free Cash for fiscal year 2010 was certified by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, 
Division of Local Services on October 6, 2010 in the amount of $ 1 ,078,7 1 7. 

TREASURER DEPARTMENT 

Kevin A. Merz, Treasurer/Collector 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the investment of all Town funds and the collection of 
Real Estate taxes, Personal Property taxes, Motor Vehicle and Boat excise taxes. The 
Treasurer/Collector's office is also responsible for all municipal borrowings, balancing cash and 
accounts receivable with the Town Accountant, selling beach stickers, accepting Passport 
applications, processing Municipal Lien Certificates and continuing collection efforts of 
properties in Tax Title. 

In 2010, the Treasurer/Collector's office sold 5,590 beach stickers, 281 fishing stickers and 27 
horse stickers. Thanks goes out to Don Carter, the Assistant Treasurer/Collector and Corinna 
Warner, the collection clerk in the Treasurer/Collector's office for their dedication, hard work and 
great customer service in 2010. 

IPSWICH BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Gelean M. Campbell, Chairman, Steven Ozahowski, Member, Peter J. Kane, Member 

For Fiscal Year 2010, the total assessed taxable valuation of Ipswich is $1,377,977,858 with a 
property tax levy of $22,447,259. The fiscal year 2010 tax rate as certified by the Department of 
Revenue is $16.29 up $1.06 from the previous year. Building permits issued in 2009 resulted in 
an additional $176,033 in tax levy growth. 

In 2009, the Board of Assessors completed their mandatory Interim Year adjustment on all 



73 



property in the town of Ipswich as required by the Department of Revenue. Under 
Massachusetts' s law, this Board is required to value all of Ipswich's 2783 properties at 100 
percent of their full and fair cash valuation, thereby insuring an equitable distribution of the 
property tax levy. The town's average single-family valuation is $493,000. More importantly, we 
believe that we have met our statutory obligation to re-establish proper assessment level and 
uniformity throughout the town of Ipswich. Final Department of Revenue certification of assessed 
valuations was granted in December and property tax bills were subsequently mailed at the end of 
December. The current valuation and levy percentages based upon property class are as follows: 



CLASS 


VALUATION 


% 


TAXES 
PAID 


LEVY % 


Residential 


1,304,500,000 


95 


21,250,305 


95 


Commercial 


56,885,000 


4 


926,657 


4 


Industrial 


823,6000 





13,416 





Personal 


15,769,258 


1 


256,881 


1 


TOTALS 


1,377,977,858 


100 


22,447,259 


100 



Also in 2009, the Assessor's Office processed over 800 applications for excise abatements, 
Elderly and Veteran Exemptions, and CPA Exemptions. We would like to assure all property 
owners that the Board of Assessors will continue its effort to meet the challenge of maintaining 
equitable assessments in this current real estate market. 






TOWN CLERK/CHIEF ELECTION OFFICER 
Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 



Population as of December 31, 2010 is 13,633 persons. 



Comparative Vital Statistics Recorded 




2008 




2009 


Births 90 




87 


Deaths 118 




122 


Marriages 59 




59 


Shellfish Licenses and Permits 


2008 




Resident Yearly 


100 




Resident Family 


174 




Resident Commercial 


125 




Student Commercial 


n/a 




Over 70 Commercial 


14 




Over 60 Recreational 


22 




Non Resident Yearly 


250 




Non Resident Daily 


25 




Eagle Hill Stickers 


9 





2010 





129 






48 




2009 




2010 


105 




136 


185 




154 


125 




125 


n/a 




j** 


13 




1 


31 




21 


274 




151 


16 




12 


5 




9 



74 



**2010 is the initial year for student commercial shellfish licenses. 

Dog Licenses 

During 2010 the Town Clerk's Office registered 1 ,964 2 dogs. 

Elections and Registrations 

I. The Board of Registrars 

Peter Ross, Chairman 

Robert M. Stone 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC/CMC 

Diane Young (resigned September 2010) 

II. Town Meetings 

May 1 1, 2010 Annual Town Meeting 

There were 240 registered voters who attended. Warrant consisted of twenty two articles 

October 25, 2010 and October 26, 2010 Special Town Meeting 

There were 203 registered voters who attended the first session of the meeting and 215 registered 
voters who attended the continued session. Warrant consisted of fourteen articles 

III. Elections 

January 19, 2010 Special State Election 

State Senate Seat Votes Cast: 6,258 
Number of Registered Voters: 10,082 
Turnout: 62.10% 

September 14, 2010 State Primary 

Votes Cast: 517 

Number of Registered Voters: 10,019 

Turnout: 1 1 .94% 

November 2, 2010 State Election 

Votes Cast: 6,383 

Number of Registered Voters: 1 0, 1 04 

Turnout: 63.18% 

May 25, 2010 Annual Town Election 

Votes Cast: 2,154 

Number of Registered Voters: 10,093 

Turnout: 21.34% 3 






75 



Registered Voters by Precinct as of December 31, 2010 is 10,070. 



Precinct 


Democrat 


Republican 


Lnenrolled 


Libertarian 


One 


585 


334 


1,352 


2 


Two 


672 


321 


1,611 


2 


Three 


471 


491 


1,666 


6 


Four 


556 


378 


1,610 


4 


Totals 


2,284 


1,524 


6,239 


14 



The Town of Ipswich also has residents enrolled in the following political designations 





Precinct One 


Precinct Two 


Precinct Three 


Precinct Four 


Green Party USA 


2 


2 








Green Rainbow 


1 





1 


1 


Inter 3 rd Party 








1 


1 



Thank you to my Assistant, Kathy Marini; Office Volunteer, Janet Trask; the Board of Registrars; 
the Constables, Wardens, Clerks, Checkers, Provisional Ballot and Tally persons; the Ipswich 
Police Department; Jeffrey Putur and his staff of the Cemetery Department; Rick Dorr and Jason 
Dorr of the Facilities Department; the YMCA staff; and to the staff at the High School Middle 
School who help set up for Town Meeting. Also, Andrew Agapow, Ronald Graves. Robert Stone 
and Phil Grenier and my family members who spend many hours setting up the night before each 
election. They all have helped to make each Election and Town Meeting a success. 






INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (MIS) 

Greg Parachojuk, MIS Director 

The MIS department is charged with the ongoing mission to develop, enhance and support the 
Town's computing and telecommunications infrastructure and, to provide the system and services 
necessary for the Town's departments and users to fulfill their stated goals and objectives. 

• All of our replacement hardware is purchased as energy efficient and "Open Source" 
software is used whenever possible. We have begun using VM (Virtual Machine) 
technology to cut purchase, maintenance, and management costs. 

• A secure Public Wireless network was added to Town Hall and a Multi-Function Kiosk 
was updated in the Assessor's mapping room to allow for Land Map analysis and Online 
Applications for Building Permits and Licenses. 

• The web was totally redone, content was increased and updated, navigation was improved 
and a new calendar was introduced. 

Please visit our website at the new domain http://wAvw.ipswichma.gov to access assessment data, 
tax maps, minutes, online payments, forms and other useful information. 

******** 



76 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Victor Dyer, Director 

Collections 

New books added: 3674 (Adult & Young Adult) and 2046 (Children). New media added: 682 
(Adult & Young Adult) and 252 (Children). 

Technology 

8500+ patrons signed up to use the Internet PCs while 24,900+ hits were recorded on the library's 
web site in 2010. An RFP was developed for the updating of the library's website. Extra Mile 
Design of Pepperell was selected as our website designer. Living Green and Food & Nutrition 
databases were added along with thirteen new Cengage Learning databases made available 
through the new Massachusetts Library System. Over 2600 sessions were recorded on the 
databases we offer. Assistant Director Genevieve Picard created a Facebook page for the library 
to reach out to non-traditional users. . The library contracted with EBSCO Publishing to provide 
access to the Novelist® Complete suite of database services. Six new public PCs were installed in 
the Gaunt Reference Room. The library began to offer patrons downloadable e-books through 
Overdrive and digital books through Safari. 

Staff 

Former Library Page Hilary Nardone was hired as Temporary Summer Assistant in the Children's 
Room. Isabel Hand was hired as Children's Page when Kathryn Morris left for college. Abigail 
Miller was hired as Sunday Reference Librarian upon the resignation of Emily Goodhue. 

Volunteers 

This year Volunteers donated over 1400 hours of service. The Boy Scouts planted bulbs along the 
library wall in the fall. One community service high school student volunteered hours this year as 
well as two college students. Members of the Town & Country Garden Club helped with yard 
maintenance while the Ipswich Garden Club decorated the library for the holidays. Dorcas Rice 
decorated the mantel in the Rogers Room. The annual Appreciation Breakfast for volunteers was 
sponsored by the Friends at the Ipswich Inn in April. 

Board of Trustees: 

Hugh McCall was appointed Library Trustee in January. Through state aid funds the Trustees paid 
for additional lighting in the non-fiction stacks. The Board subscribed to online library calendar 
software (Eventkeeper). The Board also provided funds to continue the 8 M grade book club. The 
Board approved a revised Internet Acceptable Usage Policy. During the annual cookout the 
Trustees served 300 hotdogs to the public in conjunction with the annual 'Vehicle Day' sponsored 
by the Children's room. 

Plan of Service 

We continue to make progress implementing the goals and objectives of our Plan of Service for 
2009-2013. Some of the activities accomplished in 2010 included: an exhibit to promote 
electronic resources, the development of a collection of video games for young adults, weeding 
materials in the 500's (Technology), in-house staff training by NMRLS staff, purchase & display 



77 






of portable information kiosk, purchase (by the Friends) of two leather club chairs for Rogers 
Room and construction of the new library web site. 

Public Relations 

In November the library hosted a reception, exhibit and discussion as part of the 'People & Place: 
Oral Histories & Portraits of Ipswich Seniors' directed by Lucy Meyers and Terri Unger. The 
library produced one issue of The Newsletter in 2010. The Ipswich Reads. ..One Book! Program 
continued into its sixth year with Stephen Puleo's Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood 
of 1919. CBS News filmed an interview with local resident Lenny Cavallaro in the Archives 
concerning the Amy Bishop case. Betsy Johnson submitted five 'Library Life' columns to the 
Ipswich Chronicle in 2010. The library sponsored its second annual juried art exhibit & sale in 
May. Thirty-five Ipswich artists participated in the event with 164 attendees. 

Building 

The Facilities Dept. installed new carpeting in the Children's Room. Facilities also installed new 
phones and new phone system (Avaya). Repairs were made to the roof of the 1998 addition. 
Additional new subject area signs were installed in the non-fiction stacks. 

Friends 

The Friends supported the library with funds for CDs and DVDs, refreshments, binding, printing, 
aquarium maintenance, supplies & children's programs. They paid for the installation of a Home 
Theater sound and projection system in the Collins Meeting Room. They also added the New 
England Aquarium & the Museum of Contemporary Art to the roster of museum passes available 
to the public. Through Tixkeeper software patrons can now book museum passes online. In March 
the Friends hosted a reception in recognition of the support for the library and the Friends by the 
late Louise Johnson. The Friends purchased a laminator for the Children's Room. 

Bequests & Gifts 

Donations were received in memory of Stephanie Marie Rose, Nancy Thompson, Myron Taylor, 
Florence Angoff, Annette George, Virginia Hinckley and Louise Sweetser. Other donations were 
received from Elizabeth Leavell and Loretta Quincy. WGBH Education Outreach Department 
donated to the library DVDs, books and CDs. Helen Danforth donated a framed map of the 
'Industrial History of the Ipswich River.' 

Programs 

The Children's Room offered 175 programs with 3143 children & caregivers participating. There 
were 16 Adult/YA programs with 169 participants. These figures do not include the Friends 
monthly programs. The ESL program continues to match students with tutors. A new book club 
for 8 th graders was started under the direction of Maureen Fay. 

Circulation 

Total circulation in 2010 was 152,320 items. This represents a 2.3% increase over 2009. The 
library borrowed monthly, on average, 1410 items through interlibrary loan. This is a 9.6% 
increase over 2009. 



78 



Grants 

The library received a $1000 grant from the Coburn Charitable Society for the purchase of large 
print and audiovisual materials and a $600 NMRLS Supplementary Deposit Collection grant 
which was used to further develop the collection of audio-books in the Playaway format. The two- 
year Teens & Tweens grant, federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board 
of Library Commissioners, finished up in October. Activities in 2010 included lectures, Wii open 
houses and free babysitting training. The grant also paid for improvements to the Teen Scene area, 
including the purchase of a large watercolor of Crane Beach by local artist Charlie Shurcliff. 

Archives 

We logged in 339 visits to the Archives by researchers & volunteers in 2010. Mark Amirault 
donated a book of his photographs of the 375 n parade. In 2010 the library received a second series 
of the Ipswich Garden Club papers. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard L. Korb, Superintendent 

The FY 10 school year was highlighted with significant accomplishments, as well as challenges. 
We continued to face fiscal difficulties which impacted the district's ability to deliver the 
educational services this community has come to expect and deserve. While we were able to 
utilize some federal and State stimulus funds as well as the federal "IDEA" and "Title I" grants, 
we still experienced significant cuts to our educational programs. Due to the ongoing fiscal 
difficulties we had to eliminate our Middle School World Languages program, reduce the Middle 
School Assistant Principal to part-time, and reduce elementary art, music and physical education. 
We also eliminated any funding for technology and professional development from our budget. 

Regardless, our dedicated and talented staff continued to strive to provide the best educational 
opportunities for every child Pre-K to 12 l grade. Our Birth-to-Three program continues to 
flourish, serving hundreds of families across the community. This program is entirely funded by a 
State grant and parent contributions. Our Tiger Tots Learning Center day care program for school 
employees and citizens in the community continues to grow and flourish as well. It is also funded 
by fees and gifts. 

Our MCAS scores continue to place us far above the State average, despite the fact that our per 
pupil expenditures is far below the State average. However, even with that success, we are 
committed to improve our scores. Each year teams of teachers spend hours analyzing our test 
results and make the necessary adjustments in our curriculum to ensure that we are aligned with 
the State Frameworks. 

During the FY 10 school year the district continued to work with the Town Utilities Department to 
plan for the purchase and installation of the wind turbine. At the same time we continue to 
address capital improvements aimed at improving our energy efficiency in all of our buildings 
district-wide. In recognition of these efforts, the Ipswich Public Schools has been recognized by 
the State for both its efforts in renewable energy, and also for its "Green Cleaning" initiatives. 



79 



Our curriculum delivery model is unique and highly effective as all decisions regarding 
curriculum development and implementation are made by our Subject Area Committees, which 
consist of classroom teachers and administrators. High School, Middle School and Elementary 
School staff meet regularly to ensure that our curriculum is seamless, thus providing our students 
with a comprehensive Pre-K to 12 curriculum. 

The goal of the Ipswich Public Schools is to identify and access resources and implement 
strategies that improve teaching and learning, enrich programs and inspire students and teachers. 
It is through a very special internal culture within our school system that we are able to turn this 
goal into reality through a variety of building-based initiatives and programs. The ultimate goal 
of this special culture is to have students become self-directed learners who strive toward 
continuous improvement through reflection and self-assessment. 

In conclusion, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the citizens of Ipswich who have given 
so generously to support quality education for all of our children. I also want to thank those local 
businesses and organizations that continue their support of our programs through gifts and 
donations. Finally, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the staff of the Ipswich Public 
Schools, whose dedication and commitment to excellence is second to none. 

IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in my sixteenth year as principal of this 
dynamic and exciting school. We are now in the eleventh year in this building enjoying the warm 
learning environment we have created here together. The school design has allowed us to get to 
know our students very quickly and each grade has developed its own culture creating three 
distinct neighborhoods. The facility has allowed students and teachers to access 21 Century skills 
and innovative teaching techniques as well as world-class art, music, and drama programs. Our 
school building was recently named as a "model" school by the MA Building Assistance 
Department. This is an honor for Ipswich. Other school systems continue to come and see how we 
function. Our two gyms are never empty during the day or weekends. Our students continue to 
learn "new basics" along with the old ones, as we find that both are truly important in today's 
world of work. 

Educating students has never been more challenging with the added mandated testing we now 
administer in all grades. Test results we received validated the good work being done in our 
classrooms by our teachers. MCAS testing is rigorous. Ipswich Middle School is proud to report 
that we continue to test on the very highest brackets and rank among the best. Grade 8 Language 
Arts MCAS testing ranked number 9 in the state! This is accomplished with a below average per 
pupil cost as compared to surrounding communities. 

We also continue to enjoy a relationship with our sister school in Tianjin, China. We enjoyed a 
visit from them in February and spent a week together exchanging information and learning about 
each other's cultures. It was an amazing week and we hope to continue the exchange. 



80 



Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all-important whole child. Each grade level 
specializes in exploratory and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning experiences and 
opportunities. At the Ipswich Middle School we work in a collaborative "paired partner" setting. 
All teachers have a colleague to co-teach with and the schedule allows for teachers to meet daily 
and discuss student progress. 

Middle School is a time of choices and contrasts. Whether it is the quiet solitude of our peaceful 
courtyard complete with koi fish, or the pandemonium in the gym created by middle school 
energy — there is something for everyone here at IMS. 

Students in grade 6 spend an intensive and focused week in the spring at an environmental camp, 
Ferry Beach in Saco, Maine. All of our sixth grade staff attends to form close bonds with the 
students. The outdoor marine curriculum is high interest, and many new friends and relationships 
are forged. 

Grade seven students learn first-hand about the local ecology with a series of eight separate days 
in the woods, marshes and in canoes on the Ipswich River, seeing first hand where their river 
begins and ends. They canoe through miles of forest, wetlands and marsh, collecting data all the 
way and brainstorm ways to protect our precious environment and natural resources. 

Grade eight students spend three days in early June in the Adirondacks in upper state New York. 
A geology focus helps prepare them for visits to chasms and caves and learn the difference first 
hand between stalactites and stalagmites in Howe Caverns. They cruise the glacial lakes and 
rivers and come to appreciate the power of erosion and glacial landforms. It is a wonderful 
culminating experience for them as they leave Middle School. 

We continue to provide an after school homework program for all interested students and their 
families and we understand the need for students to be busy and supervised after the last school 
bell rings. We offer many enriching programs to meet the interests of all types of children. Our 
drama, dance and music departments involve more than half of our student population. Student 
athletes participate in sports programs that teach skills, sportsmanship and wellness. At the peak 
of intramural basketball season, more than 250 students are involved. We offer golf, tennis, 
soccer, ice hockey, softball, volleyball, field hockey, basketball, track, art club, math club, 
computer club, chess club, student leadership, recycling, music programs, drama and monthly 
dances. We enforce a "no bully" zone and we have successfully created a respectful and sensitive 
learning environment. A monthly "service" component has taken the form of pet drives, shoe and 
coat drives, Haiti help, soldier boxes and turkey dinners. We also participate in the annual "Walk 
for Hunger" where together we walk a 10-mile circuit around Great Neck and back to raise 
substantial funds for the Ipswich Food Pantry. 

We are proud to be part of such an innovative and exciting learning environment. Our 
outstanding professional faculty works diligently to clarify our vision for education — that every 
child can learn. We are constantly finding new ways to reach and teach all children who come to 
our school — they are after all, the future of Ipswich. It is an exciting time to be working with 
young people. Our slogan is "making a difference starts here." We believe that, we love our 
work and we invite you to join us. 



81 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 
Barry Cahill, Principal 

The year 2010 proved to be another very successful one for the Ipswich High School. MCAS 
scores continue to demonstrate our students' success. Those reaching the highest levels of 
Advanced/Proficient included 85% in Biology, 87% in Mathematics and 88% in English. 
Ultimately all candidates for a diploma were successful on the MCAS. 

If college acceptances are a measure of the success of our program, we again excelled. A total of 
91% of our graduates went on to two year or four year colleges. The Class of 2010 had 152 
graduates who were accepted at over 180 colleges and universities. Signature colleges accepting 
our students included Bates, Bowdoin, Brown, Colgate, Cornell, Dartmouth, Middlebury, 
Skidmore, Smith, Wake Forest, Wesleyan and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 

As a follow-up visit to China a year earlier, we hosted a visiting group of students from the 
Middle School in Tieuring China that is a sister school of our Middle School. Their visit again 
brought the two cultures together. 

A major initiative for the Ipswich High School during the 2009-2010 school year was the addition 
of online access to grading on a 24 hour basis. Teachers post grades in a web based portal so that 
parents and students can access their grades from home. This innovative practice has allowed 
parents to monitor student progress on a regular basis. 

As we have come to expect annually, we have several students recognized by the National Merit 
Competition as well as a significant number of students receiving Gold, Silver and Honorable 
Mention Awards from the Boston Globe Scholarship Art Awards. 

The school year was very successful with recognitions for drama, athletics and scholarship 
throughout the year. 

IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in my sixteenth year as principal of this 
dynamic and exciting school. We are now in the eleventh year in this building enjoying the warm 
learning environment we have created here together. The school design has allowed us to get to 
know our students very quickly and each grade has developed its own culture creating three 
distinct neighborhoods. The facility has allowed students and teachers to access 21 Century skills 
and innovative teaching techniques as well as world-class art, music, and drama programs. Our 
school building was recently named as a "model" school by the MA Building Assistance 
Department. This is an honor for Ipswich. Other school systems continue to come and see how we 
function. Our two gyms are never empty during the day or weekends. Our students continue to 
learn "new basics" along with the old ones, as we find that both are truly important in today's 
world of work. 



82 



Educating students has never been more challenging with the added mandated testing we now 
administer in all grades. Test results we received validated the good work being done in our 
classrooms by our teachers. MCAS testing is rigorous. Ipswich Middle School is proud to report 
that we continue to test on the very highest brackets and rank among the best. Grade 8 Language 
Arts MCAS testing ranked number 9 in the state! This is accomplished with a below average per 
pupil cost as compared to surrounding communities. 

We also continue to enjoy a relationship with our sister school in Tianjin, China. We enjoyed a 
visit from them in February and spent a week together exchanging information and learning about 
each other's cultures. It was an amazing week and we hope to continue the exchange. 

Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all-important whole child. Each grade level 
specializes in exploratory and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning experiences and 
opportunities. At the Ipswich Middle School we work in a collaborative "paired partner" setting. 
All teachers have a colleague to co-teach with and the schedule allows for teachers to meet daily 
and discuss student progress. 

Middle School is a time of choices and contrasts. Whether it is the quiet solitude of our peaceful 
courtyard complete with koi fish, or the pandemonium in the gym created by middle school 
energy — there is something for everyone here at IMS. 

Students in grade 6 spend an intensive and focused week in the spring at an environmental camp, 
Ferry Beach in Saco, Maine. All of our sixth grade staff attends to form close bonds with the 
students. The outdoor marine curriculum is high interest, and many new friends and relationships 
are forged. 

Grade seven students leam first-hand about the local ecology with a series of eight separate days 
in the woods, marshes and in canoes on the Ipswich River, seeing first hand where their river 
begins and ends. They canoe through miles of forest, wetlands and marsh, collecting data all the 
way and brainstorm ways to protect our precious environment and natural resources. 

Grade eight students spend three days in early June in the Adirondacks in upper state New York. 
A geology focus helps prepare them for visits to chasms and caves and learn the difference first 
hand between stalactites and stalagmites in Howe Caverns. They cruise the glacial lakes and 
rivers and come to appreciate the power of erosion and glacial landforms. It is a wonderful 
culminating experience for them as they leave Middle School. 

We continue to provide an after school homework program for all interested students and their 
families and we understand the need for students to be busy and supervised after the last school 
bell rings. We offer many enriching programs to meet the interests of all types of children. Our 
drama, dance and music departments involve more than half of our student population. Student 
athletes participate in sports programs that teach skills, sportsmanship and wellness. At the peak 
of intramural basketball season, more than 250 students are involved. We offer golf, tennis, 
soccer, ice hockey, Softball, volleyball, field hockey, basketball, track, art club, math club, 
computer club, chess club, student leadership, recycling, music programs, drama and monthly 
dances. We enforce a "no bully" zone and we have successfully created a respectful and sensitive 



83 






learning environment. A monthly "service" component has taken the form of pet drives, shoe and 
coat drives, Haiti help, soldier boxes and turkey dinners. We also participate in the annual "Walk 
for Hunger" where together we walk a 10-mile circuit around Great Neck and back to raise 
substantial funds for the Ipswich Food Pantry. 

We are proud to be part of such an innovative and exciting learning environment. Our 
outstanding professional faculty works diligently to clarify our vision for education — that every 
child can learn. We are constantly finding new ways to reach and teach all children who come to 
our school — they are after all, the future of Ipswich. It is an exciting time to be working with 
young people. Our slogan is "making a difference starts hereT We believe that, we love our 
work and we invite you to join us. 

DO YON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Dave Archambault, Principal 

This past year certainly presented its challenges, both fiscally and educationally, but looking back 
the year was still one of progress and accomplishment for the Doyon Community. 

Our primary academic goal continues to be strengthening our balanced literacy program, 
particularly the area of writing. Partnering with Winthrop School, writing lab classrooms have 
been established in each building. The lab classroom teachers have received training throughout 
the school year in building a community of writers. Just recently, these classrooms have begun to 
be visited by other classroom teachers. We are excited at these small steps towards improving 
writing instruction across the elementary grades. Similarly, lab classrooms in Best Practices in 
Math Instruction have been created at each school; again, the intent is to provide a place for other 
teachers to observe math lessons being taught with the latest methodology. 

With the outstanding support of the Friends of Ipswich Elementary School we were able the past 
two years to outfit fifteen classrooms with interactive whiteboards and another six with ceiling 
mounted projections systems. The addition of this technology has truly changed instruction at 
our school. It is truly exciting to see twenty-plus year veteran teachers thrilled with new ways to 
deliver curriculum! In addition, the FRIES also sponsored numerous classroom and school wide 
enrichment programs, and were active volunteers in classrooms, the library, and during special 
events and projects including school picture day and kindergarten screening, to name a few. To 
all of the folks who contributed in any way, we extend our deepest appreciation and gratitude. 

In the area of school climate, all of the schools in Ipswich have fully implemented the new tough 
Massachusetts anti-bullying laws. At Doyon School, the pillars of that successful 
implementation have been the introduction of the Steps to Respect Anti-Bullying curriculum at 
grades four and five. The curriculum, taught in the regular classroom, gives our staff and 
students a common language to explore healthy friendships, anti-bullying strategies, and the 
important role of the bystander. Also in the realm of students, our SLT (Student Leadership 
Team) is stronger than ever, with over 120 grades four and five students participating. 

On this, the occasion of my second annual report, I would like to pay special thanks to the 
incredibly dedicated and talented faculty and staff of the Doyon School with whom it is a 



84 



pleasure to work, and to the students of the Doyon School who invariably greet each day with 
smile. 

WINTHROP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Sheila McAdams, Principal 

From Haitian earthquakes to West Virginia mining accidents, Icelandic volcano eruptions to the 
Gulf oil spill, this year's events offered ever-changing examples which magnified the importance 
of empathy. Our school-wide 2009-2010 Empathy theme became the perfect conduit for 
proactively stressing the world's interconnectedness to our own lives and community. As we 
strive to prepare students to live in a world which we struggle to imagine, this valuable human 
understanding and tolerance will certainly be a pre-requisite for active, community involvement. 

The fertile nutrients of any academic program come from the decomposition of non-effective 
practices and renewed cultivation of more valuable methods. State-wide testing revealed 
improvements in the areas of English Language Arts and mathematics, but standards for 
achievement continue to rise. Teams of teachers began this past summer critically assessing the 
effectiveness of instructional practices as well as existing resources in an effort to reach these 
targeted goals. Professional development in writing instruction and mathematics was made 
available through federal Title I funds, filling a seven year void in the district. The critical 
examination of existing curriculum comes at a perfect time as Massachusetts becomes one of 
many states to adopt a new curriculum framework. 

The generosity and considerable participation of our local community in our schools continues to 
strengthen the educational experiences and growth of our youth. An extended day was created for 
our students, which includes academic programming and enrichment opportunities, made possible 
by federal stimulus funding and volunteer efforts. Academic tutoring begins after the school day 
officially ends followed by enticing activities less familiar to our children. Our wildly-popular 
Afterschool Community Enrichment (A.C.E.) program has serviced over one hundred and fifty 
students to date with twenty-five various activities from which to choose. With funding from our 
parent group, the Institution for Savings and considerable volunteer support, we are making every 
effort to expand the program to assure that any interested student is afforded the chance to 
participate. 

Our empathy yields to our 2010/201 1 theme of Imagination as we pass into the fall. Twenty years 
ago, who could have imagined the iPad or other smart phones that exist today-or our total 
dependency on them? The Technology for Learning Initiative seeks to provide interactive 
teaching and learning technologies for our children. Monies raised from parents, staff and private 
organizations purchase updated computers, peripherals and technology tools that reinforce real- 
world experiences. The imagination of our youngest students takes flight as they enjoy the new 
age-appropriate playground equipment purchased by our parent organization. After struggling to 
reach the steps on the general playground equipment, reaching the top bars never felt so good! 
Once again, the collective determination of our learning community to fully educate our children 
is reflected in our actions. Imagine the potential of our youth! 



85 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES 

Mary L. Gallant, Director of Pupil Personnel Services 

The Special Education Department provides services to our students with disabilities as mandated 
by state and federal regulations and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary 
Education. 

We have a strong support system of special education teachers and related service providers 
(psychologists, behaviorists, counselors, speech language pathologists, occupational therapists, 
and physical therapists). There is an increased emphasis on research-based education and progress 
monitoring of students. Our educators continue to expand their repertoire of skills to meet the 
ongoing needs of our students. 

During the 2010-201 1 school year, Futures Health Core conducted a review of several key aspects 
of special education programming. Their report, including their recommendations, is being 
reviewed and meaningfully considered by administrators, educators, related service providers and 
parents. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education is currently 
conducting a Coordinated Program Review of Ipswich Public Schools' Special Education, 
English Language Learners, and Civil Rights programs and policies. We anticipate that the 
Department will provide constructive feedback so that we can continually improve our services to 
all students. 

Hall-Haskell House Committee 

Terri Stephens, Stephanie Gaskins, Co-chairs 

The Hall-Haskell-House continues its dual role as a Visitor Center and Art Gallery. Activity was 
robust in both arenas. Use of the art gallery continues to be in demand and we are delighted by 
the number of artists that choose to exhibit their work and wares. The Visitor Center is managed 
by Bill Nelson. Louise Ciolek is the Volunteer Coordinator. Louise is planning to retire and we 
thank her for her years of service. She has been a great asset to the daily operation of the Visitor 
Center. 40 volunteers donate their time to make the visitor experience a positive one and we 
appreciate their commitment. Over 5,600 visitors stopped by for information and some visited 
our downtown shops and museums. The Art Gallery continues to attract new artists. Monies to 
support this house come from a percentage of the proceeds of art sales. 

IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT COMMITTEE 

Lawrence G. Eliot, Chair 

The Town of Ipswich Bay Circuit Trail Committee consists of several Ipswich residents who meet 
monthly, second Tuesday of the month, at 7:30pm at Town Hall. Our purpose is to promote 
interest in and use of the extensive trail system in Ipswich and to act as a clearinghouse to collect 
information about the trails. While we try to monitor trail conditions, due to limited resources we 
cannot guarantee their condition. Therefore we rely on trail users and volunteers to report 
conditions and undertake any needed maintenance. We encourage members of the community to 
contact us and attend our meetings. 

86 



This year we were pleased to see a number of developments involving trails in Ipswich: 1) the 
opening of Maplecroft Farm Trail, 2) a Recreational Trail Grant for the Town - to - Crane Beach 
Connector. Extensive maintenance work has been performed on Prospect Hill. Sales of The Bay 
Circuit Guide continue to fund our projects. Routinely, the committee sponsors weekly 
Wednesday walks as well as looking into the development of future trails. 

GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Gerry Anne Brown, Chair 

The Government Study Committee meets monthly throughout the year. New members are 
welcomed. The committee spent most of its time reviewing the information gathered from other 
towns about the quorum needed for town meeting. Many towns in Massachusetts have adopted 
zero quorums for town meeting. Based on their positive recommendations and input from 
Ipswich residents, the committee recommended to the selectman that Ipswich adopt a zero 
quorum for town meeting. 

RECYCYCLING COMMITTEE 

Tim Bishop, Chair 

The Recycling Committee provides community outreach and support to residents, schools and 
local businesses for solid waste reduction in the Town of Ipswich. A Waste Reduction Program 
was implemented in July 2010 which limited residents to one free barrel of trash per week. 
Excess trash can be disposed of by purchasing overthrow bags which can be placed curbside with 
the free barrel. We have also implemented a weekly single stream recycling pick up. The new 
Waste Reduction Program has already made a difference in the reduction of trash in town. 
Recycling rates have increased and there has been a reduction in cost of solid waste disposal. The 
committee also works very closely with the schools in town to improve their recycling rate. The 
IMS/IHS cafeteria has made a great improvement in recycling this year by improved signage, a 
pour off bucket to prevent liquids from ending up in the dumpster, and a pilot composting 
program which divert food waste. Other schools are following their lead and making 
improvements as well. 



87 



TRUST FUND COMMISSION 

Alexander M. Colby, Chairman 

The Town's trust funds prospered in 2010 returning 9.4% after custodial fees. In dollar terms, the 
funds increased as follows: 

Market Value 12/31/2009 $381,470.23 
Interest $8,220.32 

Dividends $3,113.17 

Capital Appreciation $26,595.98 
Less: 

Custodial Fees -1,910.71 

Distributions -12,103.15 

Market Value 12/31/2010 $405,385.84 

The distributions, primarily in scholarships of $12,103.15 represented a meaningful increase from 
those of recent years reflecting both current income production and, more importantly, a 
substantial recovery in the funds' value from the market lows of 2009. The Commissioners hope 
to reduce the volatility of future distributions by tying them more closely to income produced in 
interest and dividends rather than feasting on capital appreciation in good years only to drastically 
reduce them in years when the markets decline. Retaining capital gains in the funds also promotes 
the preservation of their real inflation adjusted value, the paramount objective of any permanent 
trust fund. 

The trust funds are currently allocated 55% in fixed income and 45% in equities. This allocation 
supports the production of current income, reduced price volatility and longer-term growth of 
capital. As the economy recovers in 201 1, interest rates are likely to begin increasing as the 
Federal Reserve System unwinds its extremely accommodative monetary policy of the past 
several years. The fixed income portion of the portfolio is concentrated in short-term, high quality 
corporate bonds which will mature over the next few years allowing reinvestment at expected 
higher rates. The portfolio also has a significant investment in a Treasury Inflation Protection 
Security (TIPS) that produces both current income and also provides protection against inflation 
which will inevitably return. Although the equity markets have had two years of substantial 
appreciation, the unfolding economic recovery in the U.S. and continued expansion of developing 
economies supports the expectation of another year of above average returns. 



88 



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